Rembrandt at the National Gallery (Matthew Barrett)

Posted by on Dec 1, 2016 in Uncategorized | No Comments
Rembrandt at the National Gallery (Matthew Barrett)

When I have time to explore London, I very much enjoy the National Gallery. There are many treasures at the Gallery, but I especially enjoy those paintings by Rembrandt. Below is a recently published video where an expert walks you through Rembrandt’s self-portrait. I’ve included some of the narrative on Rembrandt’s life from the NG website as well.
 

Rembrandt Harmenszoon van Rijn was born in Leiden in the Netherlands in 1606. His father was a miller, comfortably off and able to send Rembrandt to the town’s Latin School. At the age of 14, Rembrandt began studying at the famous University of Leiden (unusual for a miller’s son), but academic life did not suit him. After a few months he left to begin an apprenticeship as a painter.

Leiden did not offer much in the way of artistic talent, and in 1624, after three years with a local painter, Rembrandt went to Amsterdam to study briefly with Pieter Lastman. He then moved back to Leiden and set up as an independent painter, sharing a workshop with Jan Lievens. It was not an easy climate in which to work. Following the Protestant Reformation, the local churches no longer provided artists with any commissions as the Catholic church did in other countries. As a consequence artists had to concentrate on commissions from private individuals. Rembrandt quickly began to make a name for himself as a painter of historical subjects.

Unusually, Rembrandt did not follow the advice that was given to young painters, namely to travel to Italy to study Italian art first hand. Instead he felt that he could learn everything he needed to from the art available in his native country.

In around 1631, Rembrandt moved to Amsterdam, the most prosperous port in northern Europe, and ‘crowded with merchants from every nation’. It offered a young and successful artist far more opportunities than sleepy Leiden.

Rembrandt lodged in the house of an art dealer called Hendrick van Uylenburgh, and while there, he met his landlord’s young cousin Saskia. They were married in 1634. The numerous paintings and drawings of her suggest the two were very happily married. In 1636, Saskia gave birth to their first son, Rumbartus. He died after only two weeks. Over the next four years two more children were born, but died within a couple of months.

Professionally, Rembrandt went from strength to strength. The most important families and organisations in the city commissioned paintings. As well as portraits, he produced baroque history paintings such as ‘Belshazzar’s Feast’. Cash flow was sometimes a problem – and Rembrandt’s cash flowed rather freely. He was a compulsive buyer of art, and a collector of all manner of antiquities, props, and weapons to be used in paintings. Saskia’s family accused him of squandering her fortune. But Rembrandt was the most famous artist in the city. What could go wrong?

…read the rest on the NG website

Matthew Barrett is Tutor of Systematic Theology and Church History at Oak Hill Theological College in London, as well as the founder and executive editor of Credo Magazine. He is the author of several books, including Salvation by GraceOwen on the Christian LifeGod’s Word Alone: The Authority of Scripture,  and Reformation TheologyCurrently he is the series editor of The 5 Solas Series with Zondervan. You can read more about Barrett at matthewmbarrett.com.

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8 Women who were bold for Christ: Interview with Michael Haykin (Jessalyn Hutto)

Posted by on Nov 29, 2016 in Interviews | No Comments
8 Women who were bold for Christ: Interview with Michael Haykin (Jessalyn Hutto)

Jessalyn Hutto—mother, blogger, and writer—talks with Michael A.G. Haykin about his new book, 8 Women of Faith (Crossway), a book that introduces us to the inspirational examples of women like Jane Grey, Ann Judson, Sarah Edwards, Jane Austen, and many others.

9781433548925mChurch history books are filled with the stories of men and women who have faithfully (and sometimes not so faithfully) carried on the gospel message from generation to generation. But if we are being honest, the stories of our sisters in the faith are often given short shrift in comparison to those of their male counterparts. This is understandable in many respects, as women have typically played less public roles in society until modern times. Often our Christian sisters’ contributions to the church and society have been less visible, though no less obvious or essential.

That being said, there are many women throughout history who have made tremendous contributions to our faith and impacted our society for good in such public ways that their stories should not be overlooked. In fact, I would argue that it is pivotal that their stories be told in order for the church to have a full orbed view of how men and women have worked hand in hand throughout history to carry on the banner of faith.

Dr. Michael Haykin, of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, agrees and has graciously taken the time to share how he has sought to convey the contributions of such women through his new book 8 Women of Faith in the interview below.

Why do you feel that your book, 8 Women of Faith, is important for the church today?

For the past half century gender issues have dominated public discourse, and among them in particular, those concerns generated by the Feminist movement and one of my great fears is that evangelical Christians, in their response to feminism, will deliver a knee-jerk reaction and so fail to be true to the entire gamut of the biblical view of womanhood.

Do you see this as a book written for women or do you desire for men to read it as well?

Both men and women. I hope it serves as an encouragement to women to see all that God would have them do. And for men: to give them insights how women have served the Lord in the past and so give them an understanding of how they can serve in the present.

How did you choose the women to include in your book? Were you familiar with each of their stories already or did something spur you on to focus on these particular women?

I wanted a range of women from different social contexts and also a range in how their lived out their service of the Lord. I was familiar with most of the women, yes.

The majority of these women lived during or around the 18th century. What drew you to this particular time period?

I find the 18th century especially important. Christians lived on the cusp of the modern world and faced many of the same intellectual challenges we do. But they also know revival in a way we have not seen for decades and thus it was a most curious time: very modern in its challenges and yet also vibrant in revival.

Though these women lived in a very different time and had very different struggles than modern women, in what ways do you feel they can still encourage us in our current culture?

As I said, some of the issues we face they did also. The 18th century saw the rise of the feminist movement with Mary Wollstonecraft. And so they did face some of the same issues. But what we also see is their desire to be faithful to Scripture in all of their circumstances and that is much needed.

In what ways have these women’s stories impact your own life as you’ve “gotten to the know” them?

Immensely: why do men think only men can serve as models of holiness. Lady Jane Grey encourages me to bold for Christ, for instance.

Jessalyn Hutto is a regular contributor to Credo Magazine. With a passion for theology, she loves to encourage women to study, treasure, and apply the Word of God to their daily lives. She is blessed to be the wife of Richard Hutto (a Pastoral Resident with Acts29) and the mother of three little boys: Elliot, Hudson, and Owen. She is also a regular contributor to The Council on Biblical Manhood and Womanhood’s women’s channel: Karis.

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In the works: Attributes of God and The Scriptures cannot be broken (Matthew Barrett)

Posted by on Nov 28, 2016 in Matthew Barrett | No Comments
In the works: Attributes of God and The Scriptures cannot be broken (Matthew Barrett)

9780830826001mWith God’s Word Alone: The Authority of Scripture now out and on store shelves, I’m thrilled to explore other projects. For example, I am very excited to be writing an introduction to the attributes of God for Baker Books. I can’t wait to dig my teeth into this one! I am convinced that the doctrine of God is absolutely central to our entire understanding of the Christian faith. More on that exciting book later on.

I will also be writing a book in D. A. Carson’s New Studies in Biblical Theology series. The book is tentatively called, The Scriptures Cannot Be Broken: Jesus, the Gospels, and the Authority of the Scriptures. God’s Word Alone was a historical, biblical, and systematic treatment of sola scriptura. This volume, however, will be more academic and will start from the vantage point of biblical theology, exploring Jesus’ own view of the scriptures.

Westminster Bookstore is now selling the series at 35% off. Here is more about the series and the books that have been published so far:

Addressing key issues in biblical theology, the works comprised by New Studies in Biblical Theology are creative attempts to help Christians better understand their Bibles. The NSBT series is edited by D. A. Carson, aiming to simultaneously instruct and to edify, to interact with current scholarship and to point the way ahead.

New Studies in Biblical Theology volumes focus on three areas:

  • the nature and status of biblical theology, including its relationship to other disciplines

  • the articulation and exposition of the structure of thought from a particular biblical writer or text

  • the delineation of a biblical theme across the biblical corpus

While volume notes interact with the best of recent research, the text of each work avoids untransliterated Greek and Hebrew or too much specialist jargon. The volumes are written within the framework of confessional evangelicalism, but they also engage a variety of other relevant viewpoints and significant literature.

This is a growing series and not yet complete. More volumes are forthcoming.

Matthew Barrett is Tutor of Systematic Theology and Church History at Oak Hill Theological College in London, as well as the founder and executive editor of Credo Magazine. He is the author of several books, including Salvation by GraceOwen on the Christian LifeGod’s Word Alone: The Authority of Scripture,  and Reformation TheologyCurrently he is the series editor of The 5 Solas Series with Zondervan. You can read more about Barrett at matthewmbarrett.com.

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Happy Thanksgiving from Credo Magazine…and Ronald Reagan

Posted by on Nov 24, 2016 in Announcement | No Comments
Happy Thanksgiving from Credo Magazine…and Ronald Reagan

A very Happy Thanksgiving from Credo Magazine.
But perhaps Ronald Reagan captures Thanksgiving best:
 

HT: Albert Mohler

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Coming soon…

Posted by on Nov 24, 2016 in Magazine-Sola Scriptura | No Comments
Coming soon…

credo-november-2016-cover-2-01

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Panel discussion with the editors of the NIV Zondervan Study Bible

Posted by on Nov 23, 2016 in Audio | No Comments
Panel discussion with the editors of the NIV Zondervan Study Bible

The following video is a panel session with the editors of the new NIV Zondervan Study Bible, moderated by Tom Schreiner. 

 

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Barrett’s Book Notes: New edition of the Homilies (Matthew Barrett)

Posted by on Nov 22, 2016 in Book Notes | No Comments
Barrett’s Book Notes: New edition of the Homilies (Matthew Barrett)

bookshomIn our ongoing celebration of the 500th anniversary of the Reformation, our eyes naturally turn to Martin Luther and his German reform. But we should not forget that Luther’s writings were smuggled into England and became influential, moving countless reformers to a Protestant position on justification. While there are many who deserve mention, Thomas Cranmer must be at the top of the list; his articles, prayer book, and homilies proved to be the theological backbone of future reform in England.

This new critical edition, called The Books of Homilies, published by James Clarke & Co in one volume, is a great place to start if you are unfamiliar with the English Reformation and Thomas Cranmer. Gerald Bray (PhD, Paris-Sorbonne), who was the Professor of Anglican Studies at Beeson Divinity School and is now a research professor there, has provided us with an up-to-date edition that is not only attractive but very accessible in its presentation. Gerald Bray is the right man to edit these Homilies. The Director of Research of the Latimer Trust, he has also edited Documents of the English Reformation (James Clarke & Co, 1994, second edition 2004).

Praise for the Homilies

“The Homilies are of major significance for understanding Church of England doctrine and discipline at the Reformation. We are in Gerald Bray’s debt for this new critical edition for a modern readership, which at last moves us beyond the familiar Victorian reprints. It is a perfect combination of careful scholarship and accessibility, and essential reading for every serious student of Anglicanism.”-Andrew Atherstone, Latimer Research Fellow, Wycliffe Hall, Oxford

Matthew Barrett is Tutor of Systematic Theology and Church History at Oak Hill Theological College in London, as well as the founder and executive editor of Credo Magazine. He is the author of several books, including Salvation by GraceOwen on the Christian LifeGod’s Word Alone: The Authority of Scripture,  and Reformation TheologyCurrently he is the series editor of The 5 Solas Series with Zondervan. You can read more about Barrett at matthewmbarrett.com.

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God the Son Incarnate (Stephen Wellum)

Posted by on Nov 21, 2016 in Announcement | No Comments
God the Son Incarnate (Stephen Wellum)

Stephen Wellum’s new book, God the Son Incarnate: The Doctrine of Christ, which is part of the Foundations of Evangelical Theology series, just released, published by Crossway. We are very excited to announce this new volume in Christology and in the near future we will be interviewing Wellum to discuss the importance of Christology. Currently Westminster Bookstore is selling the book at 25% off.

9781581346473mAbout the book:

Nothing is more important than what a person believes about Jesus Christ. To understand Christ correctly is to understand the very heart of God, Scripture, and the gospel. To get to the core of this belief, this latest volume in the Foundations of Evangelical Theology series lays out a systematic summary of Christology from philosophical, biblical, and historical perspectives–concluding that Jesus Christ is God the Son incarnate, both fully divine and fully human. Readers will learn to better know, love, trust, and obey Christ—unashamed to proclaim him as the only Lord and Savior.

About the Author

Stephen J. Wellum (PhD, Trinity Evangelical Divinity School) is professor of Christian theology at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary in Louisville, Kentucky, and editor of the Southern Baptist Journal of Theology. Stephen lives in Louisville, Kentucky, with his wife, Karen, and their five children.

Praise for the book

“This is a clear, comprehensive, and compelling study. It shows Christology to be like a fabric made up of many threads all tightly woven together, a doctrine with presuppositions, connections, and consequences for the age in which we live. This doctrine is here seen in its wholeness, and that is what makes this study so theologically wholesome. It is fresh and excellent.”
David F. Wells, Distinguished Senior Research Professor, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary

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Credo’s Cache

Posted by on Nov 18, 2016 in Credo's cache | No Comments
Credo’s Cache

Each week we will be highlighting important resources. Check back each Friday to see what we have dug up for you. From this week’s cache:

1. Many Hear the Gospel with Joy but Don’t Continue in the Faith: R.C. Sproul – Sproul says, “I don’t want to be too harsh in my response to reports about the successes of evangelistic events. I recognize that all outreach ministries face the problem of measuring their effectiveness. Churches generally do it by reporting the number of members in their congregations and how much they have grown over a period of time. Evangelistic ministries often do it by reporting the number of people who come to the front, raise a hand, sign a card, or pray a prayer. These ministries want to have some kind of statistic to measure the response people are making.”

2. They Excommunicated My Dad: Isaac Adams – Adams notes, “God used this discipline to show me elders are precious gifts to local churches. In the few years after the discipline, God led me to godly men in other healthy local churches. These men taught me the value of the gospel and the importance of rightly representing it corporately and individually. Using my dad’s failures in church leadership, God showed me the immense potential of an elder to either reflect or deface Christ’s love for the church. Having seen it defaced, I hope I—by God’s grace—will rightly reflect Christ’s love and humility. I hope I will always have elders surrounding me who do the same.”

3. Unless God Works, We Work in Vain: Stephen Witmer – Witmer says, “The bitter fruit of laziness, anxiety, and pride have crept into my life whenever I’ve gotten it wrong. And on the flip side, the beautiful fruit of a restful heart and selfless love has resulted from getting it right. This is no distant theoretical or theological discussion. It’s the difference between the full Christian life and spiritual stagnation.”

4. The Morning After the Election: Brad Watson – Watson says, “Today, for many we are invited to lament our way toward an understanding of the power and beauty of the gospel. For others, we are invited to break our idols in repentance. Still, to others, this is a day that demands we share the gospel life, gospel community, and gospel mission with people who are not like us. We can’t go back to our corners as the Church. We must press beyond dialogue and include each other in the essence of our lives.”

5. Why Difficulties in the Bible Are a Good Thing: Mark Ward – Ward notes, “The classic doctrine of the clarity of Scripture does not care to deny the difficulties in the Bible, any more than the apostle Peter did when he talked about the things ‘hard to understand’ in Paul’s scriptural writings. But God has loving purposes behind even those difficulties.”

Matt Manry is the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He writes at matthewwmanry.com.

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Join me at ETS and get my new book for free! (Matthew Barrett)

Posted by on Nov 15, 2016 in Announcement | No Comments
Join me at ETS and get my new book for free! (Matthew Barrett)

9780310515722_30_image-1-768x894Today I am at the annual Evangelical Theological Society conference in San Antonio. I will be presenting a paper at 2:50 called “Should we read the Bible theologically?  Debating whether dogma should inform hermeneutics.” Do join me! (Download the program here.)

Additionally, stop by the Zondervan booth. My book, God’s Word Alone: The Authority of Scripture, is going for 50% off! Now that is a deal hard to beat. Zondervan has given me 5 tickets to hand out. If you stop me at ETS and you are one of the first five, I’ll give you a ticket and you can get my book for free at the Zondervan booth.

Here is the video Zondervan made last ETS for the book and the 5 Solas Series.

This year there is a great line up of papers as usual. Here are the plenary speakers this year with their paper titles:

Fred Sanders, Torrey Honors Institute, Biola University
Evangelical Trinitarianism and the Unity of the Theological Disciplines

Gerald R. McDermott , Beeson Divinity School
How the Trinity Should Govern Our Approach to World Religions

Scott R. Swain, Reformed Theological Seminary, Orlando, Florida
The Bible and the Trinity in Recent Thought: Review, Analysis, and Constructive Proposal

Matthew Barrett is Tutor of Systematic Theology and Church History at Oak Hill Theological College in London, as well as the founder and executive editor of Credo Magazine. He is the author of several books, including Salvation by GraceOwen on the Christian LifeGod’s Word Alone: The Authority of Scripture,  and Reformation TheologyCurrently he is the series editor of The 5 Solas Series with Zondervan. You can read more about Barrett at matthewmbarrett.com.

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