ESV Bibles – 50% off!

Posted by on Dec 17, 2014 in Announcement | No Comments
ESV Bibles – 50% off!

Right now at Westminster Bookstore all ESV Bibles are 50% off! Here are a couple of Bibles that may be of interest (note especially the ESV Psalms and the ESV Pocket NT, which just came out):

9781433540677mESV Gospel Transformation Bible (Genuine Leather, Black)

The apostle Paul summed up his whole ministry as existing “to testify to the gospel of the grace of God” (Acts 20:24). That single-minded goal is the heartbeat of the ESV Gospel Transformation Bible. Produced out of the conviction that the Bible is a unified message of God’s grace culminating in Jesus, it is a significant new tool to help readers see Christ in all the Bible, and grace for all of life.

The Gospel Transformation Bible features all-new book introductions and gospel-illuminating notes written by a team of over 50 outstanding pastors and scholars. This specially prepared material outlines passage-by-passage God’s redemptive purposes of grace that echo all through Scripture and culminate in Christ. The notes not only explain but also apply the text in a grace-centered way. Focusing on heart transformation rather than mere behavior modification, their points of application emphasize the Hows and Whys of practical application to daily living—in short, how the gospel transforms us from the inside out.

Every print edition comes with free access to the Online Gospel Transformation Bible, hosted at ESVBible.org.

The Gospel Transformation Bible will equip both new and seasoned believers with a gospel-centered reading of Scripture, enabling God’s people to see that the message of the Bible is a unified one—“to testify to the gospel of the grace of God.”

 

9781433541506mThe ESV Study Bible (Trutone, Deep Brown)

“The scope and theological faithfulness of the ESV Study Bible study notes is breathtaking. Oh how precious is the written Word of God.” – John Piper

The ESV Study Bible was created to help people understand the Bible in a deeper way—to understand the timeless truth of God’s Word as a powerful, compelling, life-changing reality. To accomplish this, the ESV Study Bible combines the best and most recent evangelical Christian scholarship with the highly regarded ESV Bible text. The result is the most comprehensive study Bible ever published—with more than 2,750 pages of extensive, accessible Bible resources.

With completely new notes, maps, illustrations, charts, timelines, and articles, the ESV Study Bible was created by an outstanding team of 93 evangelical Christian scholars and teachers. In addition to the 757,000 words of the ESV Bible itself, the notes and resources of the ESV Study Bible comprise an additional 1.1 million words of insightful explanation and teaching.

 

9781433544217mThe Psalms, ESV, TruTone Brown

The Psalms is a beautiful presentation of this beloved section of Scripture. Featuring the ESV text, each psalm is presented in large, readable type on high quality paper. The layout gives ample space for the text and adds to the aesthetic value of the biblical poetry. This is a wonderful edition for devotions, for liturgical use, and as a gift.

 

9781433541452mESV Pocket New Testament with Psalms and Proverbs (TruTone, Coffee)

The ESV Pocket New Testament with Psalms and Proverbs is a highly portable edition ideal for a number of uses. It features a new typesetting that utilizes line-matching, making the Bible text substantially easier to read. The Pocket New Testament is available in a variety of covers, including gift editions to commemorate special occasions like baptisms, weddings, and births.

 

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The Privilege of Prayer (Juan R. Sanchez Jr.)

Posted by on Dec 16, 2014 in Magazine-Prayer | No Comments
The Privilege of Prayer (Juan R. Sanchez Jr.)

In the new issue of Credo Magazine, “How Then Shall We Pray? The Necessity of Prayer for the Christian Life,” Juan R. Sanchez Jr. contributed a feature article called, “The Privilege of Prayer.” Juan R. Sanchez, Jr. is Senior Pastor of High Pointe Baptist Church, Austin, Texas. He is also a council member for The Gospel Coalition.

Credo Front October 2014 CoverHere is the start of his article:

Let’s face it, prayer is not easy. In fact, if we are honest, sometimes it feels obligatory; oftentimes we’re distracted; and in some cases it may even seem boring. If you were raised in a Christian home and attended church regularly you’ve likely heard lots of people pray. Hopefully they modeled prayer well, but then again, perhaps not. It’s likely you heard lofty prayers and assumed you would never be able to pray like that, so you struggle even to pray. Consequently, you will never pray publicly because you just can’t – at least not like those “great prayer warriors” at church. Or maybe you’ve been in situations where prayer is trivialized, where people seem to be praying for the silliest of things. It may even be the case that you grew up in a prayerless home or church, so prayer has never been modeled for you.

If you are a new Christian you enter into a Christian subculture where people have their own language and traditions, and you have likely wondered, “Why do people talk to God like that?” Never mind the fact that if you came to faith in Christ from another religious tradition, you have to work through some of your own problematic prayer practices.

Then there is the reality of life. As Christians, when our circumstances overwhelm us, we intuitively cry out to God for help. But if we’ve been prayerless, we feel guilty because it seems we only go to God when we need something or when our world is falling apart. As I said, prayer is not easy, is it?

Problematic Prayer: Hypocrisy and Paganism

Jesus acknowledges the difficulty of prayer and warns against two wrong approaches. To those who love to pray publicly in order to impress others, Jesus warns that the only reward you will receive is the praises of men, for hypocrites “will have no reward from your Father who is in heaven” (Matt. 6:1, 5-6). To those who simply heap up countless words and phrases over and over again, thinking that the more words they offer the more obligated God is to hear and answer, Jesus warns, “do not be like [the pagans], for your Father knows what you need before you ask him” (Matt. 6:7-8). How then are we to pray?

Read the rest of this article today in the new issue of Credo Magazine!


To view the Magazine as a PDF {Click Here}

We live in a world that screams to get our attention. From the moment you wake up to the second you hit your pillow at night, something or someone wants your time. Hosts of people are waiting for you to friend them on Facebook. The world awaits your next tweet and blog post. Your phone is buzzing because you have another email that needs your response. When you go home and turn on your TV there are innumerable “must see” shows, as well as breaking news you cannot afford to miss.  Let’s face it, the world we live in is quite loud, and it never sleeps.

In the midst of all this noise, where does extended time in prayer fit in? Or does it? Prayer seems to run contrary to the busyness of life in the twenty-first century. If you don’t believe me, ask yourself this question, “When was the last time I spent more than 15 minutes in uninterrupted prayer with the Lord?” Church history shows that for Christians who came before us, private and corporate prayer was essential, assumed to be a necessary staple for the Christian and the church. After all, it is the God-given means by which we have fellowship and communion with God himself.  Should we neglect prayer we actually neglect God, and the consequences are spiritually fatal. But should we set aside time to pray to God, we will benefit greatly, finding God to be a refuge and a shield in the midst of a chaotic, consuming, and demanding world.

In this issue of Credo Magazine we will focus on prayer, looking at how Christians in ages past have understood the importance of prayer, as well as Scripture’s own emphasis on the necessity of prayer. Not only will we recognize the importance of prayer, but in this issue we will look at how we pray as well. My guess is that most Christians have never even thought about how they should pray. Well here is a great opportunity to do so!

Contributors include: Gerald Bray, Aimee Byrd, Juan R. Sanchez, Peter Beck, Sandy Willson, Tim Keller, Sam Storms, Phil Johnson, Donald Whitney, Nancy Guthrie, among many others.

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R. C. Sproul on the Names of God

Posted by on Dec 16, 2014 in Doctrine of God | No Comments
R. C. Sproul on the Names of God

Here are several helpful lectures from the (young!) R.C. Sproul on the Names of God: Yahweh, Adonai, Elohim, El Shaddai.
 


 

 

 

 

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Sunday’s Sermon (Schreiner, Barrett, Zaspel)

Posted by on Dec 15, 2014 in Sunday's Sermon | No Comments
Sunday’s Sermon (Schreiner, Barrett, Zaspel)

Three of Credo Magazine’s main contributors include Thomas Schreiner, Fred Zaspel, and Matthew Barrett. Each of them are professors, but they are also pastors. So each Monday morning we will be highlighting their “Sunday’s Sermon” on the blog to provide you with encouragement throughout the week and an opportunity to study God’s Word.

 

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Apply Yourself to Know the People

Posted by on Dec 15, 2014 in Jeremy Kimble, Pastoral Ministry | One Comment
Apply Yourself to Know the People

 

I had the privilege and opportunity to preach in my local church recently. It is always a joy to open the Word of God and see the work that is done through it amongst God’s people. We have been using this segment recently to discuss the shepherding ministry of the church, and as I preached that Sunday morning, I saw the connection between these two great ministries. In preaching there came to my mind people in my congregation who needed specific aspects of this text in applying to some situation they are currently facing. By God’s grace I also heard from other people after my preaching, whose lives were touched in a specific way though I knew virtually nothing of what they are currently facing (and so it is with the Word of God). However, one can see the deep connections that can exist as a pastor preaches to a people that he knows intimately. Henry Scougal was aware of the impact such a ministry could have, and we would do well to heed his words as we faithfully preach to and shepherd God’s people.

But certainly the greatest and most difficult work of a minister is in applying himself particularly to the various persons under his charge; to acquaint himself with their behavior and the temper of their souls; to redress what is amiss and prevent their future miscarriages. Without this private work, his other endeavors will do little good. Now this supposes a great deal of care, to acquaint ourselves with the humors and conversation of our people; and the name of ‘watchmen’ that is given to us implies no less.

Jeremy Kimble (PhD, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary) is Assistant Professor of Theological Studies at Cedarville University. He is an editor for Credo Magazine as well as the author of That His Spirit May Be Saved: Church Discipline as a Means to Repentance and Perseverance and numerous book reviews. He is married to Rachel and has two children, Hannah and Jonathan

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Credo’s Cache

Posted by on Dec 12, 2014 in Credo's cache | No Comments
Credo’s Cache

Each week we will be highlighting important resources. Check back each Friday to see what we have dug up for you. From this week’s cache:

1. Don’t Get An Emotional Divorce Before You are Married: Dating MistakesBy Deepak Reju - Reju says: “Here is my warning: deep emotional intimacy should not be established in the early stages of a relationship. Often times, you’ll hear from Christians (especially your parents or pastors or Christian mentors) about the importance of having physical boundaries in order to maintain purity in a dating relationship. But a guy and a gal can go too far emotionally as well.”

2. The Strange Oprahfication of Rob BellBy Samuel James - James notes: “Those who most benefited from Bell’s Mars Hill ministry are not the people who instinctively turn to Oprah Winfrey and Joel Osteen for spiritual guidance.  I feel a measure of sadness for those people; they have to feel a bit betrayed right now. Even if he was wrong in crucial ways, there was a time when Bell had something to say. I don’t think that’s the case right now.”

3. Apologetics & The Power of God’s Word (Including a little more from Origen)By Bruce Baugus - Baugus says: “Thus we have a second apology from the evident efficacy of God’s word: not only is it true, but it has the ability to bring to pass or establish whatever it declares and foretells, up to everything God has appointed it to achieve in the world. Only a word spoken with divine authority has that kind of power over reality.”

4. Church as the True LocalBy Jonathan Parnell – Parnell says: “That is what distance means, after all. It is the space between two things: knowing God and living in ignorance, tasting his goodness and glutting on trifles. The advance of the gospel means stepping right into the middle of this and determining, God help us, to bridge the gap.”

5. The Legacy of a Disciple-MakerBy Jonathan Romig - Romig says: “My mentor lived a life of grace. When he was diagnosed with stage four cancer, nothing about that grace-filled life changed. He went much quicker than expected, but I got to write him a letter before he passed. In that letter it was my turn to remind my mentor of his need for God’s grace.”

Matt Manry is the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He is currently pursuing a Master of Arts in Religion at Reformed Theological Seminary and a Masters of Arts in Christian and Classical Studies from Knox Theological Seminary.

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Announcing “The 5 Solas Series” (Zondervan)

Posted by on Dec 11, 2014 in Announcement | No Comments
Announcing “The 5 Solas Series” (Zondervan)

I am very excited to announce The 5 Solas Series, published by Zondervan, which I am editing. Starting in the Fall of 2015, Zondervan will release Thomas Schreiner’s volume, Faith Alone—The Doctrine of Justification: What the Reformers Taught…and Why It Still Matters (The Five Solas Series). From that point forward, four other volumes will release over the next two years, leading up to the 500th anniversary of the Reformation in 2017. What are these volumes? Here they are (in the order they will be released):

faithalone_comp_loresFaith Alone: The Doctrine of Justification, by Thomas Schreiner

God’s Glory Alone: The Majestic Heart of the Christian Faith and Life, by David VanDrunen

God’s Word Alone: The Authority of Scripture, by Matthew Barrett

Grace Alone: Salvation as a Gift of God, by Carl Trueman

Christ Alone: The Uniqueness of Jesus as Savior, by Stephen Wellum

Historians and theologians have long recognized that at the heart of the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation were five declarations, often referred to as the “solas”: sola scriptura, solus Christus, sola gratia, sola fide, and soli Deo gloria. These five statements summarize much of what the Reformation was about and they distinguish Protestantism from other expressions of the Christian faith. Protestants place ultimate and final authority in the Scriptures, acknowledge the work of Christ alone as sufficient for redemption, recognize that salvation is by grace alone through faith alone, and seek to do all things for God’s glory.

Five hundred years after the Reformation, we need to recover these truths and restate them for a new generation. As James Montgomery Boice once said, while the Puritans sought to carry on the Reformation, today “we barely have one to carry on, and many have even forgotten what that great spiritual revolution was all about.” In this series, you’ll travel back to the Reformation and learn where these rallying cries first emerged, examining the historical, biblical, and theological roots of the solas.  Then you’ll learn how they are relevant today and how to apply the solas in a fresh way in light of many contemporary challenges.

Zondervan has done a fantastic job with designing each book in the series, as you can see from the cover of Tom Schreiner’s volume. And having edited the first three volumes I can say this series promises to be an excellent resource for students and pastors alike, not only looking at the historical heritage of each sola, but showing its biblical foundations and relevance for today.

Two other items should be noted. First, Schreiner’s volume is already up on Amazon for pre-order! Second, each of the contributors has been invited to speak at the Southern Seminary Theology Conference in the Fall of 2015. So keep your eye open for more details are to come. We hope to see you there!

Matthew Barrett (PhD, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary) is Assistant Professor of Christian Studies at California Baptist University, as well as the founder and executive editor of Credo Magazine. Barrett is also Senior Pastor of Fellowship Baptist Church. He is the author and editor of several books, including Salvation by Grace: The Case for Effectual Calling and Regeneration. Two forthcoming books include, Owen on the Christian Life and God’s Word Alone: The Authority of Scripture. You can read about Barrett’s other publications at matthewmbarrett.com.

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The Integrity of Prayer (Tim Keller)

Posted by on Dec 10, 2014 in Magazine-Prayer | No Comments
The Integrity of Prayer (Tim Keller)

In the new issue of Credo Magazine, “How Then Shall We Pray? The Necessity of Prayer for the Christian Life,” pastor and best-selling author, Tim Keller, has contributed a column on prayer in light of his new book, Prayer: Experiencing Awe and Intimacy with God.

Keller was born and raised in Pennsylvania and educated at Bucknell University, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, and Westminster Theological Seminary. He was first a pastor in Hopewell, Virginia. In 1989 he started Redeemer Presbyterian Church in New York City with his wife, Kathy, and their three sons. Today, Redeemer has more than five thousand regular Sunday attendees and has helped to start more than two hundred and fifty new churches around the world. Some of his most recent books include: The Meaning of Marriage: Facing the Complexities of Commitment with the Wisdom of God, Counterfeit Gods: The Empty Promises of Money, Sex, and Power, and the Only Hope that Matters, The Prodigal God, Jesus the King: Understanding the Life and Death of the Son of God, and The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism. He is also co-founder (with D.A. Carson) of The Gospel Coalition. Keller lives in New York City with his family.

Credo Front October 2014 CoverHere is the start of Keller column on prayer, titled: “The Integrity of Prayer.”

If we give priority to the outer life, our inner life will be a dark, scary room. We will not know what to do with solitude. We will be deeply uncomfortable with self-examination, and we will have an increasingly short attention span for any kind of reflection. Even more seriously, our lives will lack integrity. Outwardly, we will need to project confidence, spiritual and emotional health and wholeness, while inwardly we may be filled with self-doubts, anxieties, self-pity, and old grudges. Yet we won’t know how to go into the inner rooms of the heart, see clearly what is there, and deal with it. In short, without putting a priority on the inner life, we turn ourselves into hypocrites. The seventeenth-century English theologian John Owen wrote a warning to popular and successful ministers.

A minister may fill his pews, his communion roll, the mouths of the public, but what that minister is on his knees in secret before God Almighty, that he is and no more.

Please take seriously the challenge that, without a rich prayer life, you will live as a hypocrite. To discover the real you, look at what you spend time thinking about and doing especially when no one is looking, when nothing is forcing you to think about anything in particular. When you have that freedom, do your thoughts go toward God? You may want to be seen as a humble, unassuming person, but do you take the initiative to confess sins before God? You wish to be perceived as a positive, cheerful person, but do you habitually thank God for everything you have and praise him for who he is? You may speak a great deal about what a “blessing” your faith is and how you “just really love the Lord,” but if you are prayerless—is that really true? If you aren’t joyful, humble, and faithful in private before God, then what you appear to be on the outside won’t match what you truly are.

Read the rest of Keller’s contribution in the new issue of Credo Magazine!


To view the Magazine as a PDF {Click Here}

We live in a world that screams to get our attention. From the moment you wake up to the second you hit your pillow at night, something or someone wants your time. Hosts of people are waiting for you to friend them on Facebook. The world awaits your next tweet and blog post. Your phone is buzzing because you have another email that needs your response. When you go home and turn on your TV there are innumerable “must see” shows, as well as breaking news you cannot afford to miss.  Let’s face it, the world we live in is quite loud, and it never sleeps.

In the midst of all this noise, where does extended time in prayer fit in? Or does it? Prayer seems to run contrary to the busyness of life in the twenty-first century. If you don’t believe me, ask yourself this question, “When was the last time I spent more than 15 minutes in uninterrupted prayer with the Lord?” Church history shows that for Christians who came before us, private and corporate prayer was essential, assumed to be a necessary staple for the Christian and the church. After all, it is the God-given means by which we have fellowship and communion with God himself.  Should we neglect prayer we actually neglect God, and the consequences are spiritually fatal. But should we set aside time to pray to God, we will benefit greatly, finding God to be a refuge and a shield in the midst of a chaotic, consuming, and demanding world.

In this issue of Credo Magazine we will focus on prayer, looking at how Christians in ages past have understood the importance of prayer, as well as Scripture’s own emphasis on the necessity of prayer. Not only will we recognize the importance of prayer, but in this issue we will look at how we pray as well. My guess is that most Christians have never even thought about how they should pray. Well here is a great opportunity to do so!

Contributors include: Gerald Bray, Aimee Byrd, Juan R. Sanchez, Peter Beck, Sandy Willson, Tim Keller, Sam Storms, Phil Johnson, Donald Whitney, Nancy Guthrie, among many others.

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Where is there edgy, clear, urgent preaching in England? (Paul Helm)

Posted by on Dec 9, 2014 in Paul Helm, Preaching | No Comments
Where is there edgy, clear, urgent preaching in England? (Paul Helm)

I was at a service at an Abbey last Sunday, an unfamiliar venue for me. When I am at a service in a strange place, such as the service in this gaunt but undoubtedly beautiful building, being a visitor I tend to try to adopt the outlook of a visitor. In light of what goes on in the great venues of English religion, what impression is given to someone who, like me on this occasion, joins the service as a one-off?

Such venues are these days almost invariably homes to High Anglicanism, and the Abbey provided the congregation with a share of the ceremony and ritual associated with Anglo-Catholicism. The bowings, and crossings, the processions, the physical separation of the clergy from the laity, the smell and vapour of incense, the rich regalia of those officiating. Easy to sneer. These goings-on have exact significances that I would need to be taught, but they are centred on sacramental presence, the idea of a localised presence of Christ. The idea that Christ is nearer the ‘altar’ than the congregation is, the Holy Spirit is where the incense is, and so on. But to the uninitiated like me these goings-on are largely an expression of ‘religion’ that is pretty strange, and of nothing more.

In case one is inclined to look down one’s nose at High Anglicanism, I wonder what a stranger would make of the current evangelical equivalent – the band, the informality of the service, and the easy-going bonhomie exuded by the minister. The Abbey service was at least serious throughout. ‘A serious house on serious earth’ as Larkin puts it in ‘Church Going’.

Westminster-Abbey-Whichholiday.tv_1In the service there was a short homily. The reading for the day, read earlier in the service, was the Parable of the Virgins. (The words of the Old Testament reading for the day were not read to us, for some reason.) In the address, after a brief nod in the direction of the Parable, it was left behind, like the five foolish virgins. Even though, this being the teaching of the Gospels, of words of the Saviour himself, we stood up to hear it. We stood in the manner prescribed in the Prayer Book. This was not simply Scripture but special Scripture, the Gospels.  Yet no mention in the homily of Christ who taught in parables, and whose teaching in them was largely of himself and his kingdom. Christ the heavenly bridegroom. The church the bride. In any case teenage contraception and ‘gay-marriage’ have largely dulled the significance of the parable. So some care is needed in explaining it.

The words of the speaker centred on ‘watchfulness’, like the virgins some of whom were watchful and patient and some not. On watchfulness in the nation (against terrorism, I suspect, though the word was not used); on watchfulness in our communities, for the needy, the unloved, the unwashed. And finally, with time running out (ten minutes, if that), the need for watchfulness in ourselves, in our ‘own lives’. But why? And what for? I do not recall being told.

But the point of the Parable, above all points, the point no one can read the Parable and miss, surely, is its particularism. Five of the virgins were wise, and five foolish. You don’t need to be Thomas Shepard to be  impressed on you the importance of the differences between the wise and foolish, and the finality of the Bridegroom’s word to the foolish: ‘Truly I say to you, I do not know you’(Matt. 25).

You see, while the Parable certainly cautions watchfulness, its peculiar, strange significance – watchfulness in waiting for the Bridegroom – was missed. In fact, I’d hazard that it was not narrowly missed, but that the theological world of Christ’s teaching was a thousand miles away from this homily spoken in his name.

The consequence of being prepared to be watchful was glossed as watchfulness in regard to current social and political concerns. (But at least there was not much effort, in the prayers, devoted to petitioning heaven for the success of the foreign policy of the United Kingdom and the West more generally. I was glad of that, if only because there is no NT precedent for such prayers. We never find the Apostles praying, or urging prayer, for the success of the Roman Emperor’s latest thrusts against the barbarians).

In his off-hand remarks on the parable the Christian minister circumvented a whole Christian order of things, even though platitudes were uttered by him that we could all nod in agreement with. And the impression was once more reinforced that in the Christian faith and its preaching there is nothing much to trouble us, much less to ‘offend’ us.

It is this lack of an ‘edge’ that is most sad. The difference between being one of Christ’s watchful virgins, and a sleepy virgin. The difference between being the church of Christ and the world, of his kingdom and the passing kingdoms. No edge, no clarity, no urgency. Which left me wondering, where is there edgy, clear, urgent preaching anywhere in England? We are drifting into a state in which, if they think at all about Christianity, the public think that being a Christian is an entitlement like the NHS. Universalism by default. Who will tell them any different? On the basis of this visit, certainly not the ministers of this Abbey. So who?

Paul Helm was appointed J.I. Packer Chair of Philosophical Theology at Regent College, Vancouver, in 2001. He is presently a Teaching Fellow there. Among his many books are Calvin and the Calvinists, Faith and Reason, The Trustworthiness of God, The Providence of God, Eternal God, The Secret Providence of God, The Trustworthiness of God (with Carl Trueman), John Calvin’s Ideas, Calvin at the Centre, and Calvin: A Guide for the Perplexed. 

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Sunday’s Sermon (Schreiner, Barrett, Zaspel)

Posted by on Dec 9, 2014 in Sunday's Sermon | One Comment
Sunday’s Sermon (Schreiner, Barrett, Zaspel)

Three of Credo Magazine’s main contributors include Thomas Schreiner, Fred Zaspel, and Matthew Barrett. Each of them are professors, but they are also pastors. So each Monday morning we will be highlighting their “Sunday’s Sermon” on the blog to provide you with encouragement throughout the week and an opportunity to study God’s Word.
 

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