Credo’s Cache

Posted by on Jul 22, 2016 in Credo's cache | No Comments
Credo’s Cache

Each week we will be highlighting important resources. Check back each Friday to see what we have dug up for you. From this week’s cache:

1. State of Affairs: Greg Smith – Smith says, “There are a lot of people angry at the church today. Everyone has their reasons. I will say upfront that I love the church unapologetically. I have spent ten years working with churches and thirty years as part of the church. With that being said, there has been a growing unrest building inside of me for a while.”

2. 7 Theological Issues Confronting the Local Church: Jason K. Allen – Allen notes, “There is something far worse than not having a crisis to engage. It is having a crisis but not engaging it. Faithfulness in our generation requires the church—and especially the pastors that lead it—to do our duty of preserving the faith and supporting the church. Are you ready to do yours?”

3. Doctors Live on the Brink of Death: Kathryn Butler – Butler says, “The physician suicide rate is twice that of the general population. This is no surprise. Without Christ, the daily fodder of medicine crushes the heart. Medical training mandates practitioners witness sin in graphic detail, yet the textbooks, instruments, and decades of study offer no context for forgiveness. Joseph understood God’s will at work in the face of evil (Genesis 50:20); medical training demands its practitioners confront evil, yet heaves culpability upon them.”

4. Let Us Repent of Our Nonchalance: Jared C. Wilson – Wilson says, “Pent-up hopes and dormant affections brought near the super-electric current of a fearsome reality. The hair on our arms stands up, gooseflesh springing, a sense of fresh air and being winded at the same time. Overwhelmed. That’s fear and trembling.”

5. Back to the Early Church?: Eric Davis – Davis notes, “Today, theological error still abounds. However, it is far less excusable. These days, almost everyone has a Bible. In the early church, no one did. Today, almost everyone has access to sound theological resources. Then, they did not. Today, the essential doctrines of the faith have been defined and tested over time. Then, they had not.”

Matt Manry is the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He writes at matthewwmanry.com.

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Feature Articles in Credo Magazine

Posted by on Jul 20, 2016 in Magazine-Prophet Priest King | No Comments
Feature Articles in Credo Magazine

In the new issue of Credo Magazine, “Prophet, Priest, and King,” we have three contributors who have written on each of these offices of Christ: Brandon Crowe, Luke Stamps, and Daniel Hyde.

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Read each of these feature articles in the new magazine today:

Read the magazine as a PDF

CredoJune2016C (1)A. W. Tozer once said that the most important thing about you is what comes into your mind when you think about God. I think the same could be said about Jesus. Who you think Jesus is and what you think Jesus did has major consequences for eternity. Jesus himself said this much in John’s Gospel. Belief in him, he taught, results in eternal life; yet unbelief results in eternal condemnation (John 3:18). So what we think and believe about Jesus really matters. Eternity hangs in the balance.

For this reason alone it is critical that Christians spend time studying what the Bible says about Jesus, who he is and what he has done. One of the most fruitful ways to do this is to look at Jesus through the traditional categories of prophet, priest, and king. As we transition from Old Testament to New Testament we discover that these offices find their fulfilment in Christ. He is the long-awaited Davidic king who inaugurates the kingdom of God, reigning and ruling over God’s covenant people. Yet this kingdom is announced, since Jesus is the prophet, the one who not only speaks the word of God but who is himself the Word, the Logos. Yet Jesus is not only a king and a prophet, but a priest. As Hebrews explains, he is our great high priest, the one who mediates between God and his people, interceding on their behalf by offering up himself as the perfect and sufficient sacrifice, the Lamb of God.

In this issue of Credo Magazine, three theologians walk us through this three-fold distinction, helping us understand each office better in light of the coming of Christ. So we invite you to come, like Mary (Luke 10:38-42), and sit at the feet of Jesus in order to marvel at how these offices display the glory of Christ.

CredoJune2016C (1)

 

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10 Questions with Nick Needham

Posted by on Jul 19, 2016 in Magazine-Prophet Priest King | No Comments
10 Questions with Nick Needham

In the new issue of Credo Magazine, “Prophet, Priest, and King,” Nick Needham was our guest for our usual 10 Questions.

Rev Dr Nick Needham is a Baptist minister from London. He holds the degrees of BD and PhD from the University of Edinburgh. Nick joined the teaching staff of Highland Theological College in 1999. Since 2004 he has also been the minister of Inverness Reformed Baptist Church. He has taught in Scotland at Edinburgh University and the Scottish Baptist College, and also in Africa.

Nick has published a number of books, the first two of which were in the area of Scottish Church History. His chief publishing project is a general church history series entitled 2,000 Years of Christ’s Power. The first three volumes have been published, covering the early church fathers, the Middle Ages, and the Renaissance and Reformation.

Here is the start of his interview:

Have you always loved church history and if not, what sparked your interest to become a church historian?

I disliked history at school. It was my conversion that made me a lover of church history. In becoming a Christian, I had a sense of joining a people that had a history, and I was very curious to know all about it.

What is it that makes someone a great church historian?

A blend of things, I suppose. Scholarship, imaginative sympathy with the past, ability to enable readers to see through the past’s eyes, and discerning lessons for the present.

What figures in church history do you find yourself continually drawn back to and why?

Very difficult. Maybe three Johns and a Clive: John Calvin for his sane and humble commentaries, John Milton for his poetry, prose, and epic life, John Henry Newman for his crystal-pure Anglican sermons (before he went to Rome), and C. S. Lewis for almost anything – Lewis’ understanding of the relationship between Christianity and modern society was masterful, not to mention his Narnia Chronicles and Cosmic Trilogy. …

Read the rest of this interview today!

Read the magazine as a PDF

CredoJune2016C (1)A. W. Tozer once said that the most important thing about you is what comes into your mind when you think about God. I think the same could be said about Jesus. Who you think Jesus is and what you think Jesus did has major consequences for eternity. Jesus himself said this much in John’s Gospel. Belief in him, he taught, results in eternal life; yet unbelief results in eternal condemnation (John 3:18). So what we think and believe about Jesus really matters. Eternity hangs in the balance.

For this reason alone it is critical that Christians spend time studying what the Bible says about Jesus, who he is and what he has done. One of the most fruitful ways to do this is to look at Jesus through the traditional categories of prophet, priest, and king. As we transition from Old Testament to New Testament we discover that these offices find their fulfilment in Christ. He is the long-awaited Davidic king who inaugurates the kingdom of God, reigning and ruling over God’s covenant people. Yet this kingdom is announced, since Jesus is the prophet, the one who not only speaks the word of God but who is himself the Word, the Logos. Yet Jesus is not only a king and a prophet, but a priest. As Hebrews explains, he is our great high priest, the one who mediates between God and his people, interceding on their behalf by offering up himself as the perfect and sufficient sacrifice, the Lamb of God.

In this issue of Credo Magazine, three theologians walk us through this three-fold distinction, helping us understand each office better in light of the coming of Christ. So we invite you to come, like Mary (Luke 10:38-42), and sit at the feet of Jesus in order to marvel at how these offices display the glory of Christ.

CredoJune2016C (1)

 

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Sunday’s Sermon: It Is Finished (Matthew Barrett)

Posted by on Jul 18, 2016 in Sunday's Sermon | No Comments
Sunday’s Sermon: It Is Finished (Matthew Barrett)

Credo Magazine contributors Thomas Schreiner, Matthew Barrett, and Fred Zaspel not only teach in the classroom but preach from the pulpit. So each Monday morning we will be highlighting one sermon they have preached in order to provide you with encouragement throughout your week and with an opportunity to study God’s Word.
 

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Credo’s Cache

Posted by on Jul 15, 2016 in Credo's cache | No Comments
Credo’s Cache

Each week we will be highlighting important resources. Check back each Friday to see what we have dug up for you. From this week’s cache:

1. Forgive Us Our Trespasses: Chelsea Vaughn – Vaughn says, “Wounds are tender, and they have to be treated with care. When I was a young girl playing tug of war, I felt more pain when I grabbed my leg in arrogance. I had to dig my fingers into the fleshy burn and see it with my own eyes, instead of just accepting that I was hurt and in need of help. We must examine our hurt as well.”

2. What Impedes Our Growth?: Erik Raymond – Raymond notes, “Have you wondered why some professing Christians seem to bloom and others seem to languish spiritually? They can be in the same church or even the same family, sharing many of the same experiences yet seem to differing starkly in their progress.”

3. The Heart of Hospitality: Christina Fox – Fox says, “Unlike the images we see online or in magazines, Biblical hospitality isn’t always pretty. It’s imperfect and messy. When we invite strangers into our home and share our food and life with them, it gets complicated.”

4. Pastors, Let Your Deacons Serve: Matt Capps – Capps says, “I am thankful for a body of deacons that love Jesus, and are willing to serve in a way that glorifies God. Their servant leadership frees the pastors to focus on the ministry of the word and prayer.”

5. The Honest Truth About Passive-Aggressiveness: Stephen Witmer – Witmer notes, “The most effective way to battle passive-aggressive speech — and all other sins of speech, and all other sins in general — is to identify the promises they make to us, recognize these false promises as lies, and then trust the superior promises of Jesus, by the power of the Holy Spirit.”

Matt Manry is the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He writes at matthewwmanry.com.

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Calvinism and the Christian Life – A Teaching Series by Pastor Ian Hamilton

Posted by on Jul 14, 2016 in Audio | No Comments
Calvinism and the Christian Life – A Teaching Series by Pastor Ian Hamilton

Ligonier has made available a teaching series by Pastor Ian Hamilton called “Calvinism and the Christian Life.”

 

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Check out the new issue of Credo Magazine: Prophet, Priest, King

Posted by on Jul 11, 2016 in Magazine-Prophet Priest King | No Comments
Check out the new issue of Credo Magazine: Prophet, Priest, King

The new issue of Credo Magazine is now here! “Prophet, Priest, and King.”

Read the magazine as a PDF

CredoJune2016C (1)A. W. Tozer once said that the most important thing about you is what comes into your mind when you think about God. I think the same could be said about Jesus. Who you think Jesus is and what you think Jesus did has major consequences for eternity. Jesus himself said this much in John’s Gospel. Belief in him, he taught, results in eternal life; yet unbelief results in eternal condemnation (John 3:18). So what we think and believe about Jesus really matters. Eternity hangs in the balance.

For this reason alone it is critical that Christians spend time studying what the Bible says about Jesus, who he is and what he has done. One of the most fruitful ways to do this is to look at Jesus through the traditional categories of prophet, priest, and king. As we transition from Old Testament to New Testament we discover that these offices find their fulfilment in Christ. He is the long-awaited Davidic king who inaugurates the kingdom of God, reigning and ruling over God’s covenant people. Yet this kingdom is announced, since Jesus is the prophet, the one who not only speaks the word of God but who is himself the Word, the Logos. Yet Jesus is not only a king and a prophet, but a priest. As Hebrews explains, he is our great high priest, the one who mediates between God and his people, interceding on their behalf by offering up himself as the perfect and sufficient sacrifice, the Lamb of God.

In this issue of Credo Magazine, three theologians walk us through this three-fold distinction, helping us understand each office better in light of the coming of Christ. So we invite you to come, like Mary (Luke 10:38-42), and sit at the feet of Jesus in order to marvel at how these offices display the glory of Christ.

CredoJune2016C (1)

 

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Credo’s Cache

Posted by on Jul 8, 2016 in Credo's cache | No Comments
Credo’s Cache

Each week we will be highlighting important resources. Check back each Friday to see what we have dug up for you. From this week’s cache:

1. Why Charismatics and Calvinists Need Each Other: Adam Mabry – Mabry says, “Charismatics and Calvinists need each other. We don’t have to agree to be agreeable. We don’t have to compromise our consciences to effect change. And we don’t have to sacrifice biblical faithfulness for spiritual power. We can have both, but to get both we’ll probably need to get around each other.”

2. How to Handle Difficult People: Mike Ayers – Ayers notes, “Most people would gladly exchange the effectiveness of the organization as a whole for their own comfort, convenience, stability, and control. They would allow the whole to suffer rather than change.”

3. Mystery is the Lifeblood of Worship: K. Scott Oliphint – Oliphint says, “A vibrant Christianity must include praise of God’s majestic mystery — a mystery infused with knowledge; a knowledge that sets its intentions on the praise of God’s glory; a praise that initiates our practice of holiness.”

4. No Straight Line: Greg Smith – Smith says, “Read through the Gospels. Do you get the feeling from Jesus that anything held him back from making disciples? He discipled on mountain sides, a tax collector’s home, the marketplace, and the temple (much to the chagrin of some of the religious people). He didn’t need a system or a model; he just lived it, people took notice and asked questions.”

5. When Your Missiology Misses the Gospel: Micah Fries – Fries notes, “Gospel-driven missiology, then, can look like a traditional worship service or a modern contemporary one. The form isn’t as important as justification for the form. Are we leading churches that help us to be the most satisfied versions of ourselves, or are we practicing self-denial as we seek to become all things to all people in an effort to lead the lost to Jesus?”

Matt Manry is the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He writes at matthewwmanry.com.

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New issue: Prophet, Priest, King

Posted by on Jul 7, 2016 in Magazine-Prophet Priest King | No Comments
New issue: Prophet, Priest, King

The new issue of Credo Magazine is now here! “Prophet, Priest, and King.”

Read the magazine as a PDF

CredoJune2016C (1)A. W. Tozer once said that the most important thing about you is what comes into your mind when you think about God. I think the same could be said about Jesus. Who you think Jesus is and what you think Jesus did has major consequences for eternity. Jesus himself said this much in John’s Gospel. Belief in him, he taught, results in eternal life; yet unbelief results in eternal condemnation (John 3:18). So what we think and believe about Jesus really matters. Eternity hangs in the balance.

For this reason alone it is critical that Christians spend time studying what the Bible says about Jesus, who he is and what he has done. One of the most fruitful ways to do this is to look at Jesus through the traditional categories of prophet, priest, and king. As we transition from Old Testament to New Testament we discover that these offices find their fulfilment in Christ. He is the long-awaited Davidic king who inaugurates the kingdom of God, reigning and ruling over God’s covenant people. Yet this kingdom is announced, since Jesus is the prophet, the one who not only speaks the word of God but who is himself the Word, the Logos. Yet Jesus is not only a king and a prophet, but a priest. As Hebrews explains, he is our great high priest, the one who mediates between God and his people, interceding on their behalf by offering up himself as the perfect and sufficient sacrifice, the Lamb of God.

In this issue of Credo Magazine, three theologians walk us through this three-fold distinction, helping us understand each office better in light of the coming of Christ. So we invite you to come, like Mary (Luke 10:38-42), and sit at the feet of Jesus in order to marvel at how these offices display the glory of Christ.

CredoJune2016C (1)

 

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Book Sale: Faith Alone – The Doctrine of Justification

Posted by on Jul 7, 2016 in Announcement | No Comments
Book Sale: Faith Alone – The Doctrine of Justification

Thomas Schreiner’s new book in The Five Solas Series, Faith Alone: The Doctrine of Justification: What the Reformers Taught…and Why It Still Matters, is on sale for a limited time as a Kindle book on Amazon. The paperback is also on sale (36% off) at Westminster Bookstore

51MUDo8YcVL._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_About the book:

In Faith Alone – The Doctrine of Justification renowned biblical scholar Thomas Schreiner looks at the historical and biblical roots of the doctrine of justification. He summarizes the history of the doctrine, looking at the early church and the writings of several of the Reformers. Then, he turns his attention to the Scriptures and walks readers through an examination of the key texts in the Old and New Testament. He discusses whether justification is transformative or forensic and introduces readers to some of the contemporary challenges to the Reformation teaching of sola fide, with particular attention to the new perspective on Paul.

Five hundred years after the Reformation, the doctrine of justification by faith alone still needs to be understood and proclaimed. In Faith Alone you will learn how the rallying cry of “sola fide” is rooted in the Scriptures and how to apply this sola in a fresh way in light of many contemporary challenges.

About The 5 Solas Series:

Historians and theologians have long recognized that at the heart of the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation were five declarations, often referred to as the ‘solas’: sola scriptura, solus Christus, sola gratia, sola fide, and soli Deo gloria. These five statements summarize much of what the Reformation was about, and they distinguish Protestantism from other expressions of the Christian faith. Protestants place ultimate and final authority in the Scriptures, acknowledge the work of Christ alone as sufficient for redemption, recognize that salvation is by grace alone through faith alone, and seek to do all things for God’s glory.

Other books in this series include:

God’s Glory Alone: The Majestic Heart of the Christian Faith and Life, by David VanDrunen (2015)

God’s Word Alone: The Authority of Scripture, by Matthew Barrett (September, 2016)

Grace Alone: Salvation as a Gift of God, by Carl Trueman (2017)

Christ Alone: The Uniqueness of Jesus as Savior, by Stephen Wellum (2017)

 

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