Credo’s Cache

Posted by on Aug 26, 2016 in Credo's cache | No Comments
Credo’s Cache

Each week we will be highlighting important resources. Check back each Friday to see what we have dug up for you. From this week’s cache:

1. Listen with Your Ears – and Heart: Zach Howard – Howard says, “Like any worthwhile habit, dialoguing well will take practice. But that practice will shape us into the sort of people who are able to truly learn from and love others.”

2. A Question for David Gushee: Alan Jacobs – Jacobs notes, “So in light of these warnings about what is to come, I have one question for David Gushee: So what?”

3. The Beauty of the Lord: Matthew Adams – Adams says, “The mountains and the winding roads of the Blue Ridge Parkway are breathtaking. It is impossible to make that drive and not gaze upon the beauty of creation. But the Lord is more beautiful than we could ever imagine, and we should be like David, longing to gaze upon him for all eternity. May God open our eyes even more to his beauty, as he dwells with us, reveals himself to us, nourishes and sustains us, and deals with our sin and guilt.”

4. We Have Nothing to Offer the One Who Offers Us Everything: Jared C. Wilson – Wilson says, “There is one great sign that you are loved more than you thought. It is the cross. And there is a still further sign that you will live in this love forever. It is the empty tomb. Come, you who hunger, bring your nothingness and trade it for the abundant wine and bread of Jesus Christ.”

5. Remember Their Names: James Faris – Faris notes, “While we’re on the topic of names, here’s one more tip that I received from my grandfather who served in politics and government: Public figures want to remember your name; Christian leaders want to reflect the Lord in this way. But they are not God. To their shame, they will too-often forget your name because they deal with so many people. Unless they talk with you regularly, you know them far better than they know you.”

Matt Manry is the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He writes at matthewwmanry.com.

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The Biggest Story

Posted by on Aug 24, 2016 in Announcement | No Comments
The Biggest Story

9781433542442-1mWestminster Bookstore is selling Kevin DeYoung’s new children’s book, The Biggest Story: How the Snake Crusher Brings Us Back to the Garden, illustrated by Don Clark, at 39% off. You can also purchase the DVD at 40% off.

About the book:

The Bible is full of exciting stories that fill children with awe and wonder. In The Biggest Story, best-selling author Kevin DeYoung shows kids how all those classic stories connect to Scripture’s overarching message about God’s glorious plan to redeem his rebellious people.

Featuring beautiful illustrations adapted from the book, The Biggest Story: The Animated Short Film will captivate children as they are led on an exciting journey through the Bible in 26 minutes, connecting the dots from the garden of Eden to Christ’s death on the cross to the new heaven and new earth.

Narrated by the author, this imaginative retelling of the Bible’s core message—how the Snake Crusher brings us back to the garden—will teach children that God’s promises are even bigger and better than we think.

And here is an excerpt video:

 

The Biggest Story: The Animated Short Film (Trailer) from Crossway on Vimeo.

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The gospel according to Moses: Dan Block on Deuteronomy

Posted by on Aug 23, 2016 in Audio | No Comments
The gospel according to Moses: Dan Block on Deuteronomy

Oak Hill Theological College invited Dan Block, Gunther H. Knoedler Professor of Old Testament at Wheaton College, to do a summer intensive course on Deuteronomy. The audio from those lectures is below, along with a video interview with Block. Here is OHC’s description of the series:

Dr Block led us in an exploration of the book of Deuteronomy. Like the Gospel of John, this book of Moses reflects on the significance of God’s dramatic intervention in human history. And also just like John, Deuteronomy presents us with a gospel of incredible grace.

 

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Coming soon…

Posted by on Aug 22, 2016 in Uncategorized | No Comments

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What is inerrancy and how to use it

Posted by on Aug 19, 2016 in Audio | No Comments
What is inerrancy and how to use it

Recently D. A. Carson was interviewed by Exploring Hope on the doctrine of inerrancy. Here is what Carson had to say:

 

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Two new books on J. I. Packer

Posted by on Aug 17, 2016 in Announcement | No Comments
Two new books on J. I. Packer

9781433542527mThe new biography of J. I. Packer by Leland Ryken is out and it is 50% off at Westminster Bookstore. Look for an interview with Ryken in the upcoming issue of Credo Magazine as well.

Publisher’s Description

For the last 60 years, J. I. Packer has exerted a steady and remarkable influence on evangelical theology and practice. His many books, articles, and lectures have shaped entire generations of Christians, helping elevate their view of God and enliven their love for God. In this new biography, well-known scholar Leland Ryken provides readers with a compelling overview of Packer’s interesting life and influential legacy. Exploring his childhood, college days, theological education, and professional life in both England and America, this volume combines detailed facts with personal anecdotes so as to paint a holistic portrait of the man himself. Finally, Ryken identifies lifelong themes evident in Packer’s life, ministry, and writings that shed light on his enduring significance for Christians today.

About the Author

Leland Ryken (PhD, University of Oregon) served as professor of English at Wheaton College for nearly 50 years. He has authored or edited over fifty books, including The Word of God in English, A Complete Handbook of Literary Forms in the Bible, and J. I. Packer: An Evangelical Life. He is a frequent speaker at the Evangelical Theological Society’s annual meetings and served as literary stylist for the English Standard Version Bible.

Praise for the book

“For evangelicals, J. I. Packer stands as one of the foremost theological leaders of this generation. His writings have illuminated the minds of countless Christians with the clarity of the Bible’s teaching. He has answered our questions, provoked our thinking, expanded our understanding, and always pointed us to Christ. I’m so glad that Crossway has produced this biography of the man behind the words.”
Phillip D. Jensen

“J. I. Packer is chief among the cadre of impressive British thinkers who have had a shaping influence on evangelical Christianity in North America over the past half-century. Indeed, his influence girdles the globe, and it shows no sign of abating as this great theologian approaches his tenth decade. This new biography builds on earlier Packer studies, but it offers distinctive insights into the humanity and ministry of a life lived well, with grace abounding and wisdom from above.”
Timothy George, Dean, Beeson Divinity School; Executive Editor, Christianity Today

“It is such a pleasure to read Leland Ryken’s biography of Dr. Jim Packer. Personally, I have been deeply blessed by Dr. Packer’s writing and teaching ministry for over fifty years since, as a student, I picked up “Fundamentalism” and the Word of God. I can also testify that his Knowing God was most often nominated by my seminary students as a work that profoundly influenced them. To be able to read about the man himself and to understand how God gifted and shaped him has been a moving and edifying experience. This is a good book about a great man.”
Peter Jensen

“Without a doubt, this is now the definitive, most up-to-date biography of J. I. Packer, and it deserves high praise. With the sensitivity, wisdom, and sheer humanity that a fine biographer needs, Leland Ryken allows us to see the life, mind, and heart of this quiet but highly influential man. Traversing the notoriously complex and hazardous terrain of UK and US evangelicalism with impressive sure-footedness, Ryken not only helps us understand the man and his context, but ourselves as evangelicals.”
Michael Reeves, Director of Union and Senior Lecturer, Wales Evangelical School of Theology

“This book is a fascinating, insightful, and, to my mind, precisely accurate portrait of the same Jim Packer whom I have known for more than thirty-five years. What a joy to read this book and be challenged by Packer’s remarkable life!”
Wayne A. Grudem, Research Professor of Theology and Biblical Studies, Phoenix Seminary

“This book offers a full and balanced portrait of a diligent and faithful theologian. But because J. I. Packer’s theology has always been pastoral, practical, catechetical, and eminently readable—instead of recondite, esoteric, or merely academic—it is appropriate that this welcome volume is itself down-to-earth, accessible, and reader friendly. Leland Ryken, as a veteran student of the Puritans, is the ideal author to write about the most influential Puritan of our time.”
Mark A. Noll, Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History, University of Notre Dame

9781433539527mPacker on the Christian Life

Additionally, don’t miss Sam Storms’s new book, Packer on the Christian Life: Knowing God in Christ, Walking by the Spirit (Theologians on the Christian Life), which is 23% off right now at Westminster Bookstore. 

Publisher’s Description

J. I. Packer is widely recognized as a pillar of 20th-century evangelicalism and has had a profound impact on millions of Christians living today. Now in his late eighties, Packer still exerts an enormous influence on pastors and laypeople around the world through his many books, articles, and recorded lectures–works that overflow with spiritual wisdom related to the Christian life. In this soul-stirring book, well-known pastor Sam Storms explores Packer’s legacy and profound insights into prayer, Bible study, the sovereignty of God, the Christian’s fight against sin, and more, offering readers the chance to learn from a true evangelical titan.

About the Author

Sam Storms (PhD, University of Texas at Dallas) has spent more than four decades in ministry as a pastor, professor, and the author of more than two-dozen books. He was visiting associate professor of theology at Wheaton College from 2000 to 2004, and is currently senior pastor at Bridgeway Church in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. He is the founder of Enjoying God Ministries and the author of numerous books, including Chosen for Life, Tough Topics: Biblical Answers to 25 Challenging Questions, and Kept for Jesus.

Praise for the book

“The most noteworthy feature of this book is the author’s ability to assimilate vast quantities of data, condense it, and put it into a systematic format. This begins with a wonderful biographical chapter and then proceeds to Packer’s theology. A brief version of the systematic theology that Packer has long promised the world, this book is a triumph of scholarship.”
Leland Ryken

“This is one of the best books on J. I. Packer I have read. It gets to the heart of this great theologian’s central concern, what Henry Scougal called ‘the life of God in the soul of man.’ For those of us who have sat at Packer’s feet for many years, this is a delightful reprise and refresher. For new Christians just getting to know Packer, fasten your seat belts!”
Timothy George, Dean, Beeson Divinity School; Executive Editor, Christianity Today

“The writings of J. I. Packer have been a great help to many believers in many ways. It is therefore most welcome that Sam Storms has synthesized insights from those writings in this helpful, accessible book. I’m sure Pastor Storms agrees that the very best thing about his book would be if it encouraged readers to dive into Packer’s works themselves.”
Mark A. Noll, Francis A. McAnaney Professor of History, University of Notre Dame

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Should we believe in the wrath of God?

Posted by on Aug 16, 2016 in Audio | No Comments
Should we believe in the wrath of God?

“Theology Refresh” has interviewed D. A. Carson about how Christians should think about the wrath of God. Here is what Carson had to say:
 

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Sunday’s sermon: God’s design for marriage (Matthew Barrett)

Posted by on Aug 15, 2016 in Sunday's Sermon | No Comments
Sunday’s sermon: God’s design for marriage (Matthew Barrett)

Credo Magazine contributors Thomas Schreiner, Matthew Barrett, and Fred Zaspel not only teach in the classroom but preach from the pulpit. So each Monday morning we will be highlighting one sermon they have preached in order to provide you with encouragement throughout your week and with an opportunity to study God’s Word.
 

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Credo’s Cache

Posted by on Aug 12, 2016 in Credo's cache | No Comments
Credo’s Cache

Each week we will be highlighting important resources. Check back each Friday to see what we have dug up for you. From this week’s cache:

1. When God’s Timing Is Not Our Own: Sam Storms – Storms says, “God compelled them to wait three days to allow their feelings of helplessness and hopelessness and inadequacy to reach the highest level possible. He forced them to wait until the waters of that river had risen to such a height that virtually all hope had been washed away.”

2. Secret Wisdom in the Wake of Suffering: Marshall Segal – Segal notes, “In the face of devastating news, our gut reaction and temptation might be to doubt God or run from him. But heart-wrenching wisdom and understanding are not found anywhere deep inside ourselves or somewhere far from God, but woven into his wise and sovereign love for us. We cannot capture or completely grasp his wisdom, but we can worship him and trust him with all the painful unknowns in life.”

3. Should Your Church Build a Bigger Building?: Jonathan Leeman – Leeman says, “Am I saying that churches never go overboard with their buildings? I assume some do. And do some once-full buildings now sit empty as sad, cavernous testimonies to saints who began to care too much about their own little program instead of God’s larger work of redemption? Sure. But in most of those situations, the problem wasn’t with the building; it was with dozens of other things. A building can be used well or poorly.”

4. Holding Out For The Good News: Aaron Armstrong – Armstrong says, “Reading the Prophets can be a hard slog at times, no doubt. But we need to remember this: their judgments are fierce, but the grace they hold out is great. And because of that, we need to keep going. We need to hold out for the good news. And the good news is there. We just need eyes to see it.”

5. Awkward People Don’t Need a Cure — They Need Community: Joshua Rogers – Rogers notes, “People don’t make it out of awkwardness alone — they need community. In my case, I developed long-term friendships with a handful of men and women who were honest about my awkwardness but also made it clear they would love me even if I never changed. They gave me space to feel safe and open up about the insecurities fueling my actions. And eventually their love gave me the courage to talk about the deep wounds that were actually behind my insecurities. They provided acceptance I’d never experienced before, and as a result, I flourished.”

Matt Manry is the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He writes at matthewwmanry.com.

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Do you love the Old Testament? Alec Motyer, the evangelical Gandalf

Posted by on Aug 10, 2016 in Magazine-Prophet Priest King | One Comment
Do you love the Old Testament?  Alec Motyer, the evangelical Gandalf

I knew I was going to be reviewing Alec Motyer’s Loving the Old Testament (Christian Focus, 2015) before I began reading it, so upon commencing this book I started scribbling down points in the very back which I considered “particularly helpful parts.” I wasn’t far into the book before I realized that I would have to essentially jot down every major point as particularly helpful. In nearly every conceivable way this little book is outstanding to the point that I can hardly believe so much useful content is concentrated into so few pages. If your typical book is coffee, Loving the Old Testament is espresso.

Loving the Old Testament is a bit difficult to describe. Try imagining a miniature overview of the Old Testament. Now blend it with a brief biblical theology in the tradition of Vos or Clowney. Now add several asides inserted at helpful points where Motyer devotes special attention to exegeting selected texts. Round it off with a hearty dose of practical pastoral applications peppered throughout and add a forward by Tim Keller and an afterward by D. A. Carson. If you could imagine all of this in 130 pages, you’ve got Loving the Old Testament.

As far as the strengths of this book, they are legion. It’s clearly written, interesting, supported by meticulous and creative scholarship, not infrequently humorous, reverent and pious (in the best sense), and very practically applicable especially to a local church context. Furthermore, if you know anything about biblical studies from the last 100 years, you’ll know that Motyer is essentially the evangelical Gandalf. (And anybody who is still living who used to hang out with Martyn Lloyd-Jones must be as old as Gandalf.)  I can enthusiastically recommend Loving the Old Testament as an ideal book to give to an interested layman or to use in a discipleship course. It also might make a useful tool for Sunday school classes, Wednesday night Bible studies, or even a sharp youth group.

Since all proper book reviews comment on a book’s weaknesses, here are three, purely because they’re compulsory. First, the book includes a small handful of curious typographical errors. These obviously don’t detract from the overall message or content, but might make you smirk occasionally.

Second, the book is remarkably brief, really more in the booklet category. There’s obviously nothing wrong with brevity, but you may feel as if you want “more for your money.” Lastly, Motyer does assume a fairly traditional covenant theology and amillennial hermeneutic of the Old Testament prophets, which will delight some of our readers while irritating others.

These perfunctory weaknesses out of the way, I don’t think I could recommend Loving the Old Testament highly enough. In a day when the vast majority of our teaching and preaching almost completely neglects the first 77.2% of the Bible, this book could result in a revival of learning the whole counsel of God, and even a revival of the spiritual life of the church. Loving the Old Testament is really a delightful little book in every way. If you’re a pastor, I’d encourage you to buy a couple dozen copies and keep them on your free book table or stocked in your bookstore.

Timothy Raymond, Pastor, Trinity Baptist Church, Muncie, Indiana

Read other book reviews like this one in the new issue of Credo Magazine!

Read the magazine as a PDF

CredoJune2016C (1)A. W. Tozer once said that the most important thing about you is what comes into your mind when you think about God. I think the same could be said about Jesus. Who you think Jesus is and what you think Jesus did has major consequences for eternity. Jesus himself said this much in John’s Gospel. Belief in him, he taught, results in eternal life; yet unbelief results in eternal condemnation (John 3:18). So what we think and believe about Jesus really matters. Eternity hangs in the balance.

For this reason alone it is critical that Christians spend time studying what the Bible says about Jesus, who he is and what he has done. One of the most fruitful ways to do this is to look at Jesus through the traditional categories of prophet, priest, and king. As we transition from Old Testament to New Testament we discover that these offices find their fulfilment in Christ. He is the long-awaited Davidic king who inaugurates the kingdom of God, reigning and ruling over God’s covenant people. Yet this kingdom is announced, since Jesus is the prophet, the one who not only speaks the word of God but who is himself the Word, the Logos. Yet Jesus is not only a king and a prophet, but a priest. As Hebrews explains, he is our great high priest, the one who mediates between God and his people, interceding on their behalf by offering up himself as the perfect and sufficient sacrifice, the Lamb of God.

In this issue of Credo Magazine, three theologians walk us through this three-fold distinction, helping us understand each office better in light of the coming of Christ. So we invite you to come, like Mary (Luke 10:38-42), and sit at the feet of Jesus in order to marvel at how these offices display the glory of Christ.

CredoJune2016C (1)

 

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