Credo’s Cache

Posted by on Feb 12, 2016 in Credo's cache | No Comments
Credo’s Cache

Each week we will be highlighting important resources. Check back each Friday to see what we have dug up for you. From this week’s cache:

1. We Were Made to Marvel: Erik Raymond – Raymond says, “It remains fascinating to watch people respond to things that God has made. Music, particularly classical music like this, is, in my opinion, timelessly beautiful and uniquely suited to draw out our often repressed sense of marvel.”

2. 3 Ways Our Culture Is Different From Every Other Culture in History: Gavin Ortlund – Ortlund says, “We live in a turbulent cultural moment. The world around us is rapidly changing, and we face many challenges unprecedented in the history of the church.”

3. Leadership in John 21: Jeremy Writebol – Writebol says, “If you are a leader in ministry I would challenge you to ask how your ministry goals line up with the future vision of Christ for his church.”

4. Love the Racist, Confront the Sin: Phillip Holmes – Holmes says, “The church needs less lip service and more love accompanied with action. Until we are willing to confront and discipline our brothers and sisters who are knee-deep in this type of sin, and others, we will be villages in valleys, rather than cities on a hill.”

5. 5 Tips for Young Apologists: Sean McDowell – Mcdowell notes, “It seems strange to be writing a blog with advice for young apologists. After all, I still think of myself as young!”

Matt Manry is the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He writes at matthewwmanry.com.

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Mark Dever lectures – The Spurgeon Center

Posted by on Feb 11, 2016 in Audio | No Comments
Mark Dever lectures – The Spurgeon Center

As mentioned yesterday, The Spurgeon Center, led by Christian George, is a great resource for biblical preaching. Yesterday we highlighted lectures by Albert Mohler. Today we would like to draw your attention to the lectures of Mark Dever.
 

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Albert Mohler’s lectures on Charles Spurgeon

Posted by on Feb 10, 2016 in Audio | No Comments
Albert Mohler’s lectures on Charles Spurgeon

The Spurgeon Center, led by Christian George, is a great resource for biblical preaching. Today and tomorrow we want to draw your attention to their annual lectures. The first set of lectures was given by Albert Mohler.
 

November 4, 2014 Spurgeon Luncheon with Dr. Jason Allen and Dr. Albert Mohler from Midwestern Seminary on Vimeo.

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Back to the Future

Posted by on Feb 9, 2016 in Church History, Heresy | No Comments
Back to the Future

Throughout the Back to the Future series, Marty McFly, a hapless teen­ager, continually saves the present, and the future, by going back to the past in his DeLorean. While the series didn’t help anyone understand anything about science (still, how cool is a flux capacitor?), there is one valuable takeaway: The past was once the present, and the present is what dictates the future. For Christian theology, this is an invalu­able reminder.

For pastors, ignoring the past is both foolish and dangerous. During my first stop in vocational ministry, I met a young man who had only recently been called to his first pastorate. Over the next two years, I watched as this young, uneducated preacher moved from a shallow or­thodoxy into the deep waters of heresy. As he preached week-in and week-out, he began to “see” things in the text of Scripture that led him to believe that Jesus was created by the Father. He began to embrace heresies condemned long ago as unscriptural.

In his mind, he had found something that no one else had ever found before; he was the next great theologian. But in reality, he was simply another hack heretic who would hurt believers and eventually drop out of ministry. Looking back, I wonder how a little knowledge of church history could have prevented his errors. What if he had been aware of the christological controversies in the early church and the orthodox response to the claims he was making? I believe he would still be in the ministry.

Ignorance is Problematic for Polity

For many pastors, ignoring church history will not lead to theological errors regarding the deity of Christ, but it can lead to many practi­cal errors. For much of my undergraduate education, I assumed that a democratically elected board of deacons who served in three-year terms led all churches throughout history. I was utterly floored the first time I found out that this was not the norm throughout Christian history—not even in my Southern Baptist tradition. I was shocked to learn that elders and deacons were not the same thing and that there were churches that took seriously both the distinctions between these roles and the biblical qualifications assigned to these offices. I began to rethink these matters, not because of a new approach to exegesis but because of history. These distinctions long existed, and the biblical qualifications for these roles mattered.

Through this exploration I discovered that most Christians go through life with incredible historical bias and prejudice without re­alizing it. For instance, as an American, I assumed that democracy is a “Christian” thing and that churches have always practiced this form of government. I was wrong. I found that many, including my own tradi­tion, had formerly practiced a much more biblical form of church gov­ernment: elder-led congregationalism.

Moreover, as I began to examine the historical distinctions that led to the current state of my own tradition, I found out that Southern Baptists were not always deacon-led, democratic congregationalists who hate dancing and syncopated rhythms. Instead, ours is a tradition that emphasizes baptism by immersion, religious liberty, regenerate church membership, and biblical authority (among other distinctives). History led me to understand that I was not a Baptist by tradition, but by conviction. Tradition that lacks biblical conviction can only lead to error. Convictions informed by traditions protect against error.

This principle is incredibly important. It’s now a matter of public record that denominations are in decline. Most millennials find de­nominational affiliation problematic. One impetus for this disdain of denominations arises from a misunderstanding regarding the purpose of denominations. In my experience, most Baptists aren’t sure why they are Baptist. This alone would be bad enough, but many pastors in various traditions also aren’t entirely sure why they align with the denomination in which they find themselves.

Church_History_LPI am convinced, pastors, that if you became aware of the histor­ical-theological basis for your denominational tradition, you would either jump ship or become reinvigorated in your support for your tra­dition. If you are passionate for your tradition, many in your congrega­tions will be as well. Stories shape our lives. Our traditions have a story to tell. It’s time we hear those stories and tell those stories.

This blog post is an excerpt from Hartman’s new book Church History for Modern Ministry: Why Our Past Matters for Everything We Do.

Dayton Hartman is the founding pastor of Redeemer Church in Rocky Mount, North Carolina and serves as an adjunct professor for Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. Dayton has earned a M.A. from Liberty University and a Ph.D in Church and Dogma History from North-West University (Potchefstroom).  Dayton is a regular contributor at For The Church and lives in Rocky Mount with his wife Rebekah and their two sons, Jude and Gavin. His personal website is www.daytonhartman.com

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Learning from a Giant: Three reasons to read John Owen (Matthew Barrett and Michael Haykin)

Posted by on Feb 8, 2016 in Matthew Barrett | No Comments
Learning from a Giant:  Three reasons to read John Owen (Matthew Barrett and Michael Haykin)

 

Why should we read, get to know, and learn from a Puritan like John Owen? As J. I. Packer has argued, we need to read the Puritans, and John Owen especially, because we are spiritual dwarfs by comparison.
Far too often in the recent past the focus of Christians has shifted away from the glory of God and the gospel of Jesus Christ and has instead made Christianity man-centered and success-oriented.

Consequently, Christian spirituality has become sentimental and self-indulgent. In short, we lack spiritual maturity. In contrast, John Owen was a spiritual giant. Many reasons could be listed as to why, but we will focus on just three.

1. He Had a Big View of God

First and foremost, Owen had a big view of God and a passion to see this great God lifted up in worship. The glory of God in Christ was at the very core of Owen’s thought, suffusing his writing and preaching at every turn.

Owen was radically God-centered. But for Owen, and for the Puritans generally, intellectual knowledge was not enough. Rather, one must know God experientially, or—as Owen would put it—experimentally.

In other words, it is not enough for God to be studied; God has to be served, adored, and worshipped. Truly understanding who God is and what he has done in redemptive history is meant to arouse our affections for God. Head knowledge always has to be accompanied by heartfelt experience, which leads us to our next point.

2. He Took Holiness and Communion with God Seriously

Second, we can learn much from the quality of Owen’s spirituality. In knowing God, Owen knew humanity. While human beings have been made in God’s image, sin has radically distorted them in every way. Every person stands guilty before a holy God and every person is corrupt, unwilling, and unable to turn to Christ.

For Owen, it is only through the effectual and gracious work of the Spirit that sinners are converted to Christ and thereafter grow in holiness and likeness to Christ. It is no wonder that Owen’s assistant, David Clarkson, wrote of him, “It was his great Design to promote Holiness in the Life and Exercise of it among you.”

And for Owen, this communion with the triune God was at the very center of the Christian’s sanctification and growth in holiness.

3. He Sought the Reformation of the Church

Third, Owen sought reformation, not only in the individual believer but in the corporate church. Owen was serious about both the Christian life and the church’s godliness, which in his mind was to occur through the preaching and teaching of God’s Word, the administration of the sacraments, and the practice of church discipline.

In this sense Owen was in line with the best of the 16th century Reformers. If there was any man who sought to initiate and cultivate genuine reformation in England, it was John Owen. If we desire to see spiritual renewal in our own day, we will do well to pay heed to the lessons we can glean from the life and writings of Owen.

Living for the Glory of God in Christ

It is sad that many Christians today have never heard of John Owen, let alone read this colossal Puritan. Owen simply is not read and celebrated to the extent of others, such as Martin Luther, John Calvin, and Jonathan Edwards.

Nevertheless, he should be. Owen’s writings are a gold mine just waiting to be dug up and discovered anew.

Matthew Barrett is Tutor of Systematic Theology and Church History at Oak Hill Theological College in London, as well as the founder and executive editor of Credo Magazine. Barrett is the author of numerous book reviews and articles in academic and popular journals and magazines. He is the author of several books, including Salvation by Grace: The Case for Effectual Calling and RegenerationOwen on the Christian Life: Living for the Glory of God in Christ (Theologians on the Christian Life)God’s Word Alone: The Authority of ScriptureCurrently he is the series editor of The 5 Solas Series with Zondervan. You can read more about Barrett at matthewmbarrett.com.

Michael A. G. Haykin is Professor of Church History and Biblical Spirituality at The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. He is the author of many books, including Rediscovering the Church Fathers: Who They Were and How They Shaped the Church. Haykin is the director of the Andrew Fuller Center for Baptist Studies.

Read other columns in the recent issue of Credo Magazine

View the magazine as a PDF

Church history matters. We are not the first generation to read the Bible. So looking to the help of those who have come before us is incredibly valuable. There is no need to reinvent the wheel. Many godly individuals have preceded us and more often than not their insights into God’s Word tend to be far more valuable than what you will find on the best seller rack of a Christian bookstore. By looking to those giants of the faith in the history of the church, not only do we avoid falling prey to the heresies of the past, but we also stand firmly on the shoulders of others so that we persevere in sound doctrine (Titus 2:1).

COVEROne set of broad shoulders belongs to the seventeenth-century Puritan John Owen. It is hard to exaggerate the importance and influence of Owen’s life and writings. His books were and still are some of the best works in theology that we have, standing alongside those of Augustine, Luther, Calvin, and many others. The Christian today will benefit in countless ways from works like On Communion with God, The Doctrine of Justification by Faith, On the Mortification of Sin, and Of Indwelling Sin in Believers.

What is so remarkable about Owen, however, is not merely the robust, biblical theology nature of his writings, but his insistence that theology affects the Christian life. In other words, Owen refused to separate head and heart. Doctrine must lead to doxology every time, otherwise we have not truly understood its purpose. Therefore, Owen is the Doctor who looks into the human soul in order to diagnose our spiritual disease and offer us a cure in Jesus Christ. If read carefully, it is hard not to finish a book by Owen without feeling a desire to know God more.

The upcoming year, 2016, will be the four hundredth anniversary of Owen’s birth. So what better timing for an issue of Credo Magazine that aims to introduce some of Owen’s theology and writings. But as much as we love you reading Credo Magazine, this issue would be a failure if you did not study and read this Prince of Puritans for yourself.

Contributors include: J. V. Fesko, Ryan M. McGraw, Geoff Thomas, Daniel R. Hyde, Joel Beeke, Leonardo De Chirico, Kelly M. Kapic, Michael Haykin, and many others. 

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Credo’s Cache

Posted by on Feb 5, 2016 in Credo's cache | No Comments
Credo’s Cache

Each week we will be highlighting important resources. Check back each Friday to see what we have dug up for you. From this week’s cache:

1. Joy Is Not Optional: David Mathis – Mathis says, “It is good news that joy is not optional in the Christian life, because the final weight falls not on our weak backs, but on the almighty shoulders of God himself.”

2. When A Christian Sins: Jason Helopoulos – Helopoulos says, “A repentant and confessing Christian has much to remind themselves of when they fall into sin. We need the comfort of the gospel and its strong encouragements. We need reminders to quite our souls with peace regarding the past and reminders to galvanize them for action going forward.”

3. 20 Qualities of Good Listeners: Gavin Ortlund – Ortlund says, “I have been reflecting lately on how important – and how difficult – it is to listen. I am coming to understand how much conflict and misunderstanding is related to a failure to listen well, and I want to become a better listener.”

4. They Know My Voice: Matt Rogers – Rogers says, “Ours is a noisy world. An endless cacophony of voices clamors for our attention every day. The incessant ping of our cell phones reminds us that we are always on call. Some of these voices overtly seek to lure our hearts away from God, toward the wicked desires of our hearts.”

5. A Review of The Paul Debate: Books At A Glance – Check out this review of N.T. Wright’s latest book.

Matt Manry is the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He writes at matthewwmanry.com.

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Skeptical Theism, Predestination, and our Cognitive Limitations (Matt Manry)

Posted by on Feb 4, 2016 in Philosophy, Predestination, Theology | No Comments
Skeptical Theism, Predestination, and our Cognitive Limitations (Matt Manry)

I recently read a very helpful article by Derek Rishmawy titled, “Calvinism and the Problem of Evil (Or, Dealing with the Sparsity Objection).” In this article, Rishmawy deals explicitly with divine sovereignty, libertarian free will, and the problem of evil. All-in-all it was a very helpful article. Nevertheless, in the conclusion of his article, he briefly mentioned some quick thoughts about predestination that really got me thinking about how skeptical theism can be applied to the doctrine of predestination. In the following paragraphs, hopefully, I can demonstrate how recognizing the cognitive position that we are in as human beings should impact the way that we approach the doctrine of God’s election.

A (Brief) Overview of The Reformed View of Predestination and Salvation

To put it briefly, Calvinists have usually argued that the Bible teaches that God elects some to salvation and some to eternal damnation. The Westminster Confession of Faith, a document central to the Reformed faith, puts it this way: “By the decree of God, for the manifestation of his glory, some men and angels are predestinated unto everlasting life, and others foreordained to everlasting death.” A few of the main biblical texts that Calvinists typically point to in support of the doctrine of predestination are Ephesians 1:4-5, Romans 8:28-30, and Romans 9:10-24. When it comes to the doctrine of salvation, Calvinists are typically monergistic (This is the belief that humans are born again only by God’s working). With all of this stated, I want to now turn and talk about how skeptical theism stands in concord with the Reformed view of predestination.

Skeptical Theism and Predestination

Skeptical theism is essentially the view we should be skeptical of our ability to discern God’s reasons for acting or refraining from acting in any particular instance. Now usually skeptical theism is used as a response to the evidential problem of evil, but I think in this case I can definitely apply skeptical theism to how one should look upon the Reformed view of predestination.

Our Cognitive Limitations and the Doctrine of Predestination

There are a lot of people who look at the Reformed view of predestination and say, “I cannot accept that God would predestine some for heaven and some for hell.” This seems like a rational response. As human beings, in terms of fairness, we want to envision that God has given us all free will so that the ball is in our court in regards to whether or not we accept/reject him. Logically, it also seems to fit very nicely into our theological boxes to assume that God gives everyone an equal chance. I definitely understand this. But let’s assume for a moment that this isn’t exactly the way things are.

As Christians, we must do our best to systematize our doctrine with what we have been given. This is why the Bible has to always be central in all of our theological discussion. So let’s assume once more (for the sake of this post) that the Bible does not teach anything about libertarian free will. If that is the case then we have the responsibility to try and understand what the Bible teaches. And even though we might not be able to fully grasp the doctrine of God’s election, it does not follow that it is not the sound biblical truth. Think about this for a moment. A five-year-old child is going to have an extremely difficult time grasping the reasons why his Mother and Father do some of the things that they do on a daily basis. This is to be expected. The cognitive distance between the child and his parents is extreme. To the child, it seems very hurtful and unfair that Daddy has to leave and go to work each and every morning. In the child’s mind, he just can’t understand why Daddy would do this. It’s just not right.

However, as we all very well know, this child’s Father is in fact going to continue going to work throughout the week. He explains to his son, “You know that Daddy loves you and you just have to trust me. I promise to be home later today when I’m done with work. Daddy has to make money so that we can survive!”

The reason I have used this example is to show you the importance of recognizing cognitive limitations. Humble theology should always recognize the infinite gap that lies between the mind of God and the mind of man. So even though libertarian free will and a synergistic salvation scheme might make more logical sense (in our human minds), it does not necessarily follow that this is in fact the way that God works and operates.

So when we approach the Bible, we must be willing to live with some of the tension. This is why skeptical theism can help us when approaching tough theological doctrines. While a theology of mystery says that predestination is a doctrine that is simply difficult for us to understand; skeptical theism says that we shouldn’t be surprised if there are certain theological doctrines that we can’t fit nicely into a box. This is due to our cognitive position. We should actually expect not to be able to fully fathom the doctrine of predestination if skeptical theism is rightly applied. Hopefully, I’ve at least demonstrated some of the harmonies that exist between skeptical theism and predestination in this post.

Matt Manry is an editor for Credo Magazine as well as the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He is currently pursuing his Ph.D. at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom.

Originally published at matthewwmanry.com

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Credo Magazine: The Prince of Puritans: John Owen

Posted by on Feb 3, 2016 in Uncategorized | No Comments
Credo Magazine: The Prince of Puritans: John Owen

The new issue of Credo Magazine is now here! The Prince of Puritans: John Owen

View the magazine as a PDF

Church history matters. We are not the first generation to read the Bible. So looking to the help of those who have come before us is incredibly valuable. There is no need to reinvent the wheel. Many godly individuals have preceded us and more often than not their insights into God’s Word tend to be far more valuable than what you will find on the best seller rack of a Christian bookstore. By looking to those giants of the faith in the history of the church, not only do we avoid falling prey to the heresies of the past, but we also stand firmly on the shoulders of others so that we persevere in sound doctrine (Titus 2:1).

COVEROne set of broad shoulders belongs to the seventeenth-century Puritan John Owen. It is hard to exaggerate the importance and influence of Owen’s life and writings. His books were and still are some of the best works in theology that we have, standing alongside those of Augustine, Luther, Calvin, and many others. The Christian today will benefit in countless ways from works like On Communion with God, The Doctrine of Justification by Faith, On the Mortification of Sin, and Of Indwelling Sin in Believers.

What is so remarkable about Owen, however, is not merely the robust, biblical theology nature of his writings, but his insistence that theology affects the Christian life. In other words, Owen refused to separate head and heart. Doctrine must lead to doxology every time, otherwise we have not truly understood its purpose. Therefore, Owen is the Doctor who looks into the human soul in order to diagnose our spiritual disease and offer us a cure in Jesus Christ. If read carefully, it is hard not to finish a book by Owen without feeling a desire to know God more.

The upcoming year, 2016, will be the four hundredth anniversary of Owen’s birth. So what better timing for an issue of Credo Magazine that aims to introduce some of Owen’s theology and writings. But as much as we love you reading Credo Magazine, this issue would be a failure if you did not study and read this Prince of Puritans for yourself.

Contributors include: J. V. Fesko, Ryan M. McGraw, Geoff Thomas, Daniel R. Hyde, Joel Beeke, Leonardo De Chirico, Kelly M. Kapic, Michael Haykin, and many others. 

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Does the Trinity Really Matter? A Layman’s Guide to John Owen’s Communion with God (Ryan M. McGraw)

Posted by on Feb 1, 2016 in Magazine: Prince of Puritans | One Comment
Does the Trinity Really Matter? A Layman’s Guide to John Owen’s Communion with God (Ryan M. McGraw)

In the new issue of Credo Magazine, “The Prince of Puritans: John Owen,” Ryan M. McGraw has contributed an article called, “Does the Trinity Really Matter? A Layman’s Guide to John Owen’s Communion with God.”  Ryan McGraw is pastor of First Orthodox Presbyterian Church in Sunnyvale, California, research associate at the University of the Free State, and adjunct professor of systematic theology at Greenville Presbyterian Theological Seminary. He is the author of The Foundation of Communion with God: The Trinitarian Piety of John Owen (his inexpensive book!) and A Heavenly Directory: Trinitarian Piety, Public Worship and a Reassessment of John Owen’s Theology (Reformed Historical Theology) (his expensive book!).

Here is the start of his article:

Writing on John Owen is like building an iPad (sorry in advance to non-Apple fans). The R&D department must work hard to engineer a product using terms that the average person does not understand, but without which there could be no iPad. After long hours of research, planning, meetings, tests, and trips to China, the iPads begin rolling off the assembly line. The end product must be useable, and someone then tries to show people why they need one.

I wrote a very expensive book on Owen and a very inexpensive book on Owen. The very expensive book has hundreds of footnotes and takes great pains to argue from primary sources, set Owen in his historical context, and interact with other scholars. It is very expensive partly because some of these scholars need a paycheck for combing through such works in order to make them better. My very inexpensive book on Owen represents what happens when church members ask, “Why have you spent so much time writing about John Owen?” My primary answer is that Owen is the best author in English to teach us how to enjoy fellowship with all three persons in the Trinity. In that light, my aim is to sell you an “Owen iPad” by helping you understand why he is important and how he can help you know the triune God better.

How to Build an Owen iPad: The Context of Owen’s Trinitarian Piety

Some scholars have called Owen the greatest theologian that England ever produced. Yet he is old and dead, so why should you care? He neither wrote blog posts nor had Facebook or Twitter accounts. The Apostle Paul wrote in Ephesians 4:11-16,

And He Himself gave some to be apostles, some prophets, some evangelists, and some pastors and teachers, for the equipping of the saints for the work of ministry, for the edifying of the body of Christ, till we all come to the unity of the faith and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to a perfect man, to the measure of the stature of the fullness of Christ; that we should no longer be children, tossed to and fro and carried about with every wind of doctrine, by the trickery of men, in the cunning craftiness of deceitful plotting, but, speaking the truth in love, may grow up in all things into Him who is the head—Christ—from whom the whole body, joined and knit together by what every joint supplies, according to the effective working by which every part does its share, causes growth of the body for the edifying of itself in love.

Paul included “pastors and teachers” among the offices listed here. Christ’s positive purposes in giving such men to the church are to equip the saints and to promote unity in the faith and spiritual maturity. His negative purpose is to protect believers from theological and practical instability as well as from false teachers. Christ’s plan for your life is for you to read your Bible daily and to sit under sound preaching (Acts 17:10-11). We are not obligated to read theologians from the past in the same way that we are obligated to belong to local churches and to sit under a local ministry. Yet can we not benefit from those men who are among Christ’s greatest “gifts” to the church in her history? …

Read the rest of this article today!

View the magazine as a PDF

Church history matters. We are not the first generation to read the Bible. So looking to the help of those who have come before us is incredibly valuable. There is no need to reinvent the wheel. Many godly individuals have preceded us and more often than not their insights into God’s Word tend to be far more valuable than what you will find on the best seller rack of a Christian bookstore. By looking to those giants of the faith in the history of the church, not only do we avoid falling prey to the heresies of the past, but we also stand firmly on the shoulders of others so that we persevere in sound doctrine (Titus 2:1).

COVEROne set of broad shoulders belongs to the seventeenth-century Puritan John Owen. It is hard to exaggerate the importance and influence of Owen’s life and writings. His books were and still are some of the best works in theology that we have, standing alongside those of Augustine, Luther, Calvin, and many others. The Christian today will benefit in countless ways from works like On Communion with God, The Doctrine of Justification by Faith, On the Mortification of Sin, and Of Indwelling Sin in Believers.

What is so remarkable about Owen, however, is not merely the robust, biblical theology nature of his writings, but his insistence that theology affects the Christian life. In other words, Owen refused to separate head and heart. Doctrine must lead to doxology every time, otherwise we have not truly understood its purpose. Therefore, Owen is the Doctor who looks into the human soul in order to diagnose our spiritual disease and offer us a cure in Jesus Christ. If read carefully, it is hard not to finish a book by Owen without feeling a desire to know God more.

The upcoming year, 2016, will be the four hundredth anniversary of Owen’s birth. So what better timing for an issue of Credo Magazine that aims to introduce some of Owen’s theology and writings. But as much as we love you reading Credo Magazine, this issue would be a failure if you did not study and read this Prince of Puritans for yourself.

Contributors include: J. V. Fesko, Ryan M. McGraw, Geoff Thomas, Daniel R. Hyde, Joel Beeke, Leonardo De Chirico, Kelly M. Kapic, Michael Haykin, and many others. 


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Credo’s Cache

Posted by on Jan 29, 2016 in Credo's cache | No Comments
Credo’s Cache

Each week we will be highlighting important resources. Check back each Friday to see what we have dug up for you. From this week’s cache:

1. Theology That Comforts the Weary Soul: Christina Fox – Fox says, “The doctrine of God’s sovereignty is an important one to study and learn during the calm seasons of life. Then when the rough winds blow and a fierce storm enters our life, we are already anchored to the truth. Rather than flounder in the seas of uncertainty and fear, we can rest in the sure comfort that all things are under our Sovereign God’s care and control.”

2. The Mountaintop Experience: Sean Nolan – Nolan says, “All of Scripture exists to reveal Christ to us—the Word that became flesh. It may not sound as exciting and appealing as some of the stories of modern miracles and sensationalism, but the saint who has spent eighty faithful years in seemingly mundane Bible reading has a better foundation than he who spent it chasing the next mountaintop experience.”

3. The World Needs Pastors: Owen Strachan – Strachan says, “Let us remember that there are few ways in which a shepherd more images the work of Christ, the kindness of God, than in his service to the suffering. The work done in this area may seem intangible. On the last day, though, I assure you that it will all be very tangible. The Lord will reward his faithful servants and his suffering shepherds.”

4. Theology Is Not a Luxury Item: Caleb Greggsen – Greggsen says, “We are not omniscient. We do not know what doctrines will help the church in East Asia, Botswana, or Iran face the challenges that lie ahead, precisely because we don’t know what challenges lie ahead. But we do know the One who knows all those things.”

5. Messages from the Edge: Suicide Notes on Social Media: Halee Gray Scott – Scott says, “Over 40,000 Americans and more than a million people worldwide die by suicide each year. It’s the country’s tenth leading cause of death overall and one of the most common causes of death among young people and people in middle age.”

Matt Manry is the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He writes at matthewwmanry.com.

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