Credo’s Cache

Posted by on May 27, 2016 in Credo's cache | One Comment
Credo’s Cache

Each week we will be highlighting important resources. Check back each Friday to see what we have dug up for you. From this week’s cache:

1. Grieve and Recieve the Gift of Special Needs: Andrew Wilson – Wilson says, “Sometimes gifts are not quite what we wanted — and we need to allow ourselves the space to say so, while acknowledging that God knows what he is doing.”

2. 10 Things You Should Know About Satan: Sam Storms – Storms notes, “Satan is not eternal. He is a finite creature. He is, therefore, God’s Devil. Satan is not the equal and opposite power of God (contra dualism). His power is not infinite. He does not possess divine attributes. In sum, he is no match for God! At most, Satan is the equal and opposite power of the archangel Michael.”

3. The Reluctant Missionary: Ben Riggs – Riggs says, “Grace came from the extravagance of Heaven into the everydayness of Earth. And Grace knows the depth of a tomb so we can know the heights of the Kingdom. I’ve learned that Grace scares us from the stories we want, and surprises us with stories we could never ask for, nor imagine.”

4. No Adam, No Christ!: Nick Batzig – Batzig says, “Nevertheless, the connection between the creation account and the subsequent redemptive revelation form the internal witness of Scripture to the idea that the historicity and theology of the creation narrative is inseparably linked to the historicity and theology of the redemptive (i.e. new creation) revelation.”

5. When Honor Becomes Toxic: Dave Harvey – Harvey notes, “Toxic honor. You’ve seen it. I know I have. In fact I’ve done it. The public introductions that went way too long, the private praise that slid towards flattery. It’s honor overkill, and I carry the toxins. I’ve maneuvered conversations for a small slice of praise and instantly felt starved the moment praise fell silent.”

Matt Manry is the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He writes at matthewwmanry.com.

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Barrett’s Book Notes: Scripture

Posted by on May 26, 2016 in Book Notes | No Comments
Barrett’s Book Notes: Scripture

9780199686971Kevin Killeen, Helen Smith, Rachel Willie, eds. The Oxford Handbook of the Bible in Early Modern England, c. 1530-1700. New York: Oxford University Press, 2015.

Here is a fascinating collection of articles on the use and influence of the Bible in Modern England. The chapters are diverse, exploring how individuals like Cranmer, Milton, King James VI, and many others understood Scripture. This volume also devotes several chapters to the history of translation, as well as the Bible’s role in politics.  Don’t miss the helpful chronology at the end of the book (just before the extensive bibliography).

9780199793228Douglas Sweeney. Edwards the Exegete: Biblical Interpretation and Anglo-Protestant Culture on the Edge of the Enlightenment. New York: Oxford University Press, 2016.

If you want to know Jonathan Edwards better, Douglas Sweeney is a key guide. His new book breaks into new territory, looking at Edwards’s approach to scriptural exegesis. Sweeney believes Edwards utilized four different methods in his interpretation of Scripture: canonical, Christological, redemptive-historical, and pedagogical. Sweeney doesn’t just focus on Edwards, however, but places his exegesis within the larger context of the Enlightenment.

9781433552632John Piper. A Peculiar Glory: How the Christian Scriptures Reveal Their Complete Truthfulness. Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2016.

I believe in the self-attesting, self-authenticating nature of Scripture. Not all do! But I think it is crucial to a consistently biblical worldview and its understanding of divine authority. In Piper’s new book he turns to this subject, but he takes us deeper than usual treatments.  The book centers on the question: “How are we to know that the Christian Scriptures are the word of God?” Piper answers, “In and through the Scriptures we see the glory of God” (13). He elaborates: “My argument is that the glory of God in and through the Scriptures is a real, objective, self-authenticating reality. …The pathway that leads to sight may involve much empirical observation, and historical awareness, and rational thought (see chapter 17). But the end we are seeking is not a probably inference from historical reasoning but a full assurance that we have seen the glory of God” (15). He builds his thesis off of the Westminster Larger Catechism (Q 4), as well as texts like 2 Cor. 4:4-6 (among many others).

9780802865762mD. A. Carson, eds. The Enduring Authority of the Christian Scriptures. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2016.

I thoroughly enjoyed many chapters in this large and impressive volume. This edited volume adds to the many other volumes Carson has edited on Scripture and hermeneutics. Chapters in this book I found especially insightful include:

“The Bible in the Reformation and Protestant Orthodoxy,” by Robert Kolb

“The ‘Old Princetonians’ on Biblical Authority,” by Bradley N. Seeman

“Roman Catholic Views of Biblical Authority from the Late Nineteenth Century to the Present,” by Anthony N. S. Lane

“Why a Book? Why This Book? Why the Particular Order within This Book? Some Theological Reflections on the Canon,” by Graham A. Cole

“God and the Bible,” by Peter F. Jensen

“The Generous Gift of a Gracious Father: Toward a Theological Account of the Clarity of Scripture,” by Mark D. Thompson

“May We God Beyond What Is Written After All? The Pattern of Theological Authority and the Problem of Doctrinal Development,” by Kevin J. Vanhoozer

“Science and Scripture,” by Kirsten Birkett

As a theological student or pastor, this book is a must for your theological library.

9781433548659mJohn MacArthur, ed. The Scripture Cannot Be Broken: Twentieth Century Writings on the Doctrine of Inerrancy. Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2015.

There are certain essays on the doctrine of inerrancy that every student of Scripture must read. MacArthur has done a fine job of pulling together some of the most important essays. While I recommend that you read all of them, a few that are essential include:

“The Attestation of Scripture,” by John Murray

“Scripture Speaks for Itself,” by John M. Frame

“The Biblical Idea of Inspiration,” by Benjamin Breckinridge Warfield

“Some Reflections upon Inspiration,” by Edward J. Young

“The Meaning of Inerrancy,” by Paul D. Feinberg

9781433548611mJohn MacArthur, ed. The Inerrant Word: Biblical, Historical, Theological, and Pastoral Perspectives. Wheaton, IL: Crossway, 2016.

Here is another fine collection of essays by a host of evangelicals defending inerrancy in light of challenges today. I believe I am right to assume that some of these essays are drawn from the 2015 Shepherds’ Conference on inerrancy. Again, read the entire book. Yet chapters you might want to start with include:

“The Power of the Word in the Present: Inerrancy and the Reformation,” by Carl R. Trueman

“How Did It Come to This? Modernism’s Challenges to Inerrancy,” by Stephen J. Nichols

“Rightly Dividing the Word of Truth: Inerrancy and Hermeneutics,” R. Albert Mohler Jr.

“The Holy Spirit and the Holy Scriptures: Inerrancy and Pneumatology,” Sinclair Ferguson

“Do We Have a Trustworthy Text? Inerrancy and Canonicity, Preservation, and Textual Criticism,” Michael Kruger

Matthew Barrett is Tutor of Systematic Theology and Church History at Oak Hill Theological College in London, as well as the founder and executive editor of Credo Magazine. Barrett is the author of numerous book reviews and articles in academic and popular journals and magazines. He is the author of several books, including Salvation by Grace: The Case for Effectual Calling and RegenerationOwen on the Christian Life: Living for the Glory of God in Christ (Theologians on the Christian Life)God’s Word Alone: The Authority of ScriptureCurrently he is the series editor of The 5 Solas Series with Zondervan. You can read more about Barrett at matthewmbarrett.com.

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New Studies in Biblical Theology Series: 55% off!

Posted by on May 26, 2016 in Announcement | No Comments
New Studies in Biblical Theology Series: 55% off!

9780830826001mWestminster Bookstore is having a BIG sale on the New Studies in Biblical Theology Series. The 39 volume set is being sold at 55% off!

Publisher’s Description

Addressing key issues in biblical theology, the works comprising New Studies in Biblical Theology are creative attempts to help Christians better understand their Bibles. The NSBT series is edited by D. A. Carson, aiming to simultaneously instruct and to edify, to interact with current scholarship and to point the way ahead.

New Studies in Biblical Theology volumes focus on three areas:

 

  • the nature and status of biblical theology, including its relationship to other disciplines
  • the articulation and exposition of the structure of thought from a particular biblical writer or text
  • the delineation of a biblical theme across the biblical corpus

While volume notes interact with the best of recent research, the text of each work avoids untransliterated Greek and Hebrew or too much specialist jargon. The volumes are written within the framework of confessional evangelicalism, but they also engage a variety of other relevant viewpoints and significant literature.

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Preachers who changed the world

Posted by on May 24, 2016 in Announcement | No Comments
Preachers who changed the world

Do you take the preaching of God’s Word seriously? Are you hungry to hear expository preaching? Then check out the new issue of Credo Magazine:  “Preach the Word: Preachers who changed the world”

Download as a PDF

Paul instructed Timothy to “preach the word; be ready in season and out of season; reprove, rebuke, and exhort, with complete patience and teaching. (2 Tim. 4:2). The command is a simple one. Yet, churches today and their pastors fail to take it seriously. Some churches are so used to being fed soundbites from the culture, that sitting down and listening to a sermon for thirty minutes seems not only old fashioned but ridiculously burdensome. Other churches do hear preaching but it is anything but the preaching of “the word.” Instead, the time is filled with one man’s own opinions. Entertaining or interesting as they may be, they are not God’s Word nor the exposition of it. Is it any wonder that churches are filled with malnourished Christians, believers who, whether they know it or not, are being fed milk instead of solid meat?

Needless to say, this is not what the apostle Paul envisioned. Paul taught Timothy that it is absolutely essential to the spiritual health of God’s people to hear the Word itself. By expositing the scriptures, the people hear what God himself has to say, and they walk away knowing who God is, what he has done, and how they are to live according to his will. In this issue of Credo Magazine we aim to help pastors and churchgoers alike recover a love for Bible-preaching. Several contempoary pastors explain what expositional preaching is, why it matters so much, and how churches today can recover the expository sermon in the pulpit. Other contributions take us back in time to those preachers God used in extraordinary ways. By looking to the ministries of men like Spurgeon, Augustine, Edwards, Lloyd-Jones, and others, we desire to see their preaching influence our own. Imitation is not the goal; we rather crave their commitment to expounding the scriptures and pray God’s people would as well.

Contributors include Christian T. George, David P. Barshinger, Jason Helopoulos, Christopher Catherwood, Adrian Reynolds, Adrian Reynolds, Michael A.G. Haykin, Jonathan Worsley, Murray Capill, Deven MacDonald, and others.

Matthew Barrett, Executive Editor

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Sunday’s Sermon: Jonah, the great fish, and the Son of Man (Matthew Barrett)

Posted by on May 23, 2016 in Sunday's Sermon | No Comments
Sunday’s Sermon: Jonah, the great fish, and the Son of Man (Matthew Barrett)

Credo Magazine contributors Thomas Schreiner, Matthew Barrett, and Fred Zaspel not only teach in the classroom but preach from the pulpit. So each Monday morning we will be highlighting one sermon they have preached in order to provide you with encouragement throughout your week and with an opportunity to study God’s Word.
 

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Credo’s Cache

Posted by on May 20, 2016 in Credo's cache | No Comments
Credo’s Cache

Each week we will be highlighting important resources. Check back each Friday to see what we have dug up for you. From this week’s cache:

1. Gandalf, Job, and the Indignant Love of God: Derek Rishmawy – Rishmawy says, “Easily one of the most bracing passages in Scripture, God’s words to Job are exhilarating in their majestically aggressive grandeur. After 36 chapters of divine silence in the face of Job’s comforters and Job’s passionate self-defense—indeed, his prosecution of God’s justice and character—the Holy One opens his mouth and reduces Job to stunned, repentant silence.”

2. May I Help You Discern Your Calling?: John Piper – Piper notes, “God does not intend for all of his people to take on the specialized calling of learning a new language and culture, and of embedding themselves in an unreached people group to make disciples and plant churches.”

3. Jesus Welcomed REAL Sinners. Do We?: Scott Sauls – Sauls says, “Consider the Apostle Paul. He was not above humbling himself. In Romans 7 he gives us a window into his personal struggle with the sin of coveting—a sin nobody would see unless he told them—and the way that the gospel gave him hope in the face of his coveting. In 1 Timothy Paul identifies himself as the chief of all sinners. If we intend to reflect Jesus in our ministries and our messages, we need to get over our love for reputation and image.”

4. Brand Reformation: A Conversation about Martin Luther with Historian Andrew Pettegree: Albert Mohler – Check out this wonderful discussion between Mohler and Pettegree!

5. The Freedom to Be Happy (For Someone Else): Michael Kelley – Kelley notes, “The gospel frees us from this compulsion. The reason the gospel frees us in this sense is because in the gospel, Paul writes earlier in Romans 12, we find a renewal of our minds. Practically, that means our minds are renewed in the way we view other people.”

Matt Manry is the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He writes at matthewwmanry.com.

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5 new articles on 5 old solas

Posted by on May 18, 2016 in Matthew Barrett | No Comments
5 new articles on 5 old solas

It’s been a real joy to edit each of the five volumes in The 5 Solas Series (Zondervan). These volumes are progressively releasing and by 2017 the entire set will be available. In the meantime, you can now get a taste for what each of the authors have been working on by reading The Southern Baptist Journal of Theology, which has just published an article by each contributor.

20150924_9414-lower (1)Here they are with a short excerpt from each:

“Justification by Works and Sola Fide,” by Thomas Schreiner

“Sola Scriptura in the Strange Land of Evangelicalism: The Peculiar but Necessary Responsibility of Defending Sola Scriptura Against Our Own Kind,” by Matthew Barrett

“The Word as a Means of Grace,” Carl Trueman

“Glory to God Alone: Another Look at a Reformation Sola,” by David VanDrunen

“Solus Christus: What the Reformers Taught and Why It Still Matters,” by Stephen Wellum

Matthew Barrett is Tutor of Systematic Theology and Church History at Oak Hill Theological College in London, as well as the founder and executive editor of Credo Magazine. Barrett is the author of numerous book reviews and articles in academic and popular journals and magazines. He is the author of several books, including Salvation by Grace: The Case for Effectual Calling and RegenerationOwen on the Christian Life: Living for the Glory of God in Christ (Theologians on the Christian Life)God’s Word Alone: The Authority of ScriptureCurrently he is the series editor of The 5 Solas Series with Zondervan. You can read more about Barrett at matthewmbarrett.com.

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Stephen Wellum on the biblical covenants

Posted by on May 17, 2016 in Audio | No Comments
Stephen Wellum on the biblical covenants

Recently Matthew Barrett commended Stephen Wellum’s new book (with Brent Parker) on progressive covenantalism. You can read about it here.

Today we bring a few more resources to your attention. The first is a video B&H did with Wellum. The next set of videos is an interview series with Wellum on a host of topics, both theological and pastoral.
 

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Sunday’s sermon: Faith Alone (Thomas Schreiner)

Posted by on May 16, 2016 in Sunday's Sermon | No Comments
Sunday’s sermon: Faith Alone (Thomas Schreiner)

Credo Magazine contributors Thomas Schreiner, Matthew Barrett, and Fred Zaspel not only teach in the classroom but preach from the pulpit. So each Monday morning we will be highlighting one sermon they have preached in order to provide you with encouragement throughout your week and with an opportunity to study God’s Word.
 

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Credo’s Cache

Posted by on May 13, 2016 in Credo's cache | No Comments
Credo’s Cache

Each week we will be highlighting important resources. Check back each Friday to see what we have dug up for you. From this week’s cache:

1. 4 Essentials For Cultivating Disciples: Mathew Sims – Sims says, “The Church is constantly conversing about what discipleship should look like. These conversations only buttress the truth that proper discipleship strikes at the heart of the Christian faith. Without right discipleship, our faith deforms.”

2. The Means of Grace: Joe Thorn – Thorn notes, “To say that we are saved by grace alone through faith alone in Christ alone is the essence of the gospel. Our fundamental hope in life and death is that we are saved by God’s grace and not by our efforts. And one of the wonders of God’s grace is that it abounds to us through means.”

3. How To Develop a Christian Ethic: Russell Moore – Moore says, “Developing a Christian ethic means understanding human nature. And that means listening and developing empathy for people, especially people who are in a different situation than you.”

4. 3 Essential Leadership Lessons from Jesus: Mark Dance – Dance says, “Jesus promised His Disciples thrones in which to judge the twelve tribes of Israel, and almost immediately they start itching to get in them. In their excitement they mistakenly told their friends and family.”

5. Real Men Love Strong Women: Paul Maxwell – Maxwell notes, “Strong women rebuke good men, who need help in their weaknesses, who need someone to help them see how to be strong.”

Matt Manry is the Assistant Pastor at Life Bible Church in Canton, Georgia. He writes at matthewwmanry.com.

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